Archeology News

Archeology News

Archaeology News

Scientists pioneer new way to analyze ancient artwork

Scientists have used a combination of three advanced imaging techniques to produce a highly detailed analysis of a second century Egyptian painting. They are the first to use the specific combination -- which they termed "macroscale multimodal chemical imaging" -- to examine an ancient work of art.
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Posted: December 11, 2017, 7:59 pm

How much can 252-million-year-old ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lot

During the late Permian, the equator was dry and desert-like, yet surprisingly a hotspot for biodiversity, new paleontological research shows. Similarly to modern rainforests, equator ecosystems were home a unique diversity of species, including those both anciently and newly evolved. After the late Permian extinction, this diversity was decimated, and the climate change event that triggered an extinction back then is informative as we move forward with protecting our planet's species diversity.
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Posted: December 11, 2017, 7:04 pm

Revising the story of the dispersal of modern humans across Eurasia

Most people are now familiar with the traditional 'Out of Africa' model: modern humans evolved in Africa and then dispersed across Asia and reached Australia in a single wave about 60,000 years ago. However, technological advances in DNA analysis and other fossil identification techniques, as well as an emphasis on multidisciplinary research, are revising this story. Recent discoveries show that humans left Africa multiple times prior to 60,000 years ago, and that they interbred with other hominins in many locations across Eurasia.
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Posted: December 7, 2017, 7:17 pm

It's all in the ears: Inner ears of extinct sea monsters mirror those of today's animals

A new study has revealed that an extinct group of marine reptiles called sauropterygians evolved similar inner ear proportions to those of some modern day aquatic reptiles and mammals.
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Posted: December 7, 2017, 7:16 pm

More than 1,000 ancient sealings discovered

Classical scholars have discovered a large number of sealings in southeast Turkey. More than 1,000 sealings give new insights into the Greco-Roman pantheon. The finds were in a late antique building complex point to a hitherto unknown church.
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Posted: December 7, 2017, 3:25 pm

More than 1,000 ancient sealings discovered

Classical scholars have discovered a large number of sealings in southeast Turkey. More than 1,000 sealings give new insights into the Greco-Roman pantheon. The finds were in a late antique building complex point to a hitherto unknown church.
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Posted: December 7, 2017, 3:25 pm

Venezuelan rock art mapped in unprecedented detail

Rock engravings located in Western Venezuela -- including some of the largest recorded anywhere in the world -- have been mapped in unprecedented detail.
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Posted: December 7, 2017, 2:49 pm

New species of extinct marsupial lion discovered in Australia

A team of Australian scientists has discovered a new species of marsupial lion which has been extinct for at least 19 million years. The findings are based on fossilized remains of the animal's skull, teeth, and humerus (upper arm bone) found in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of remote northwestern Queensland.
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Posted: December 7, 2017, 12:37 am

Synchrotron sheds light on the amphibious lifestyle of a new raptorial dinosaur

A well-preserved dinosaur skeleton from Mongolia unites an unexpected combination of features that defines a new group of semi-aquatic predators related to Velociraptor. Detailed 3-D synchrotron analysis allowed an international team of researchers to present the bizarre 75-million-year-old predator, named Halszkaraptor escuilliei. The study not only describes a new genus and species of bird-like dinosaur that lived in Mongolia but also sheds light on an unexpected amphibious lifestyle for raptorial dinosaurs.
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Posted: December 6, 2017, 6:22 pm

Separated since the dinosaurs, bamboo-eating lemurs, pandas share common gut microbes

A new study finds that bamboo lemurs, giant pandas and red pandas share 48 gut microbes in common -- despite the fact that they are separated by millions of years of evolution.
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Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:24 pm

Litte Foot takes a bow

Little Foot is the only known virtually complete Australopithecus fossil discovered to date. It is by far the most complete skeleton of a human ancestor older than 1.5 million years ever found. It is also the oldest fossil hominid in southern Africa, dating back 3.67 million years. For the first time ever, the completely cleaned and reconstructed skeleton was viewed by the national and international media.
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Posted: December 6, 2017, 3:01 pm

How the oldest compound eyes were constructed

Researchers have discovered that the compound eyes of today's insects and crustaceans are still constructed in much the same way as they were in their extinct ancestors 500 million years ago. The research team looked at fossil trilobites. However, these arthropods lacked the lenses of contemporary compound eyes.
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Posted: December 6, 2017, 3:01 pm

Aerial Technology Directs Archaeologists to Idumean Structure

With the aid of drones, archaeologists working in the Lachish region found what may be an Idumean palace or temple.

The post Aerial Technology Directs Archaeologists to Idumean Structure appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Biblical Archaeology Society Staff
Posted: December 6, 2017, 2:31 pm

Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea

Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water.
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Posted: December 6, 2017, 2:07 pm

New approach measures early human butchering practices

Researchers have found that statistical methods and 3-D imaging can be used to accurately measure animal bone cut marks made by prehistoric human butchery, and to help answer pressing questions about human evolution.
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Posted: December 6, 2017, 2:05 pm

Could ancient bones suggest Santa was real?

Was St Nicholas, the fourth century saint who inspired the iconography of Santa Claus, a legend or was he a real person? New research has revealed that bones long venerated as relics of the saint, do in fact date from the right historical period.
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Posted: December 6, 2017, 1:30 am

Could ancient bones suggest Santa was real?

Was St Nicholas, the fourth century saint who inspired the iconography of Santa Claus, a legend or was he a real person? New research has revealed that bones long venerated as relics of the saint, do in fact date from the right historical period.
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Posted: December 6, 2017, 1:30 am

Cooling climate drove evolution of Tasmanian Devil and its relatives

A big drop in global temperatures 12-14 million years ago may explain the evolutionary success of Australia's unique marsupial carnivores, a new study has found.
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Posted: December 5, 2017, 7:25 pm

Storytellers promoted cooperation among hunter-gatherers before advent of religion

Storytelling promoted cooperation in hunter-gatherers prior to the advent of organized religion.
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Posted: December 5, 2017, 5:00 pm

Meteorite analysis shows reduced salt is key in Earth's new recipe

Scientists have found the halogen levels in the meteorites that formed the Earth billions of years ago are much lower than previously thought.
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Posted: December 5, 2017, 3:42 pm

Archaeologists revise chronology of the last hunter-gatherers in the Near East

The 15,000-year-old 'Natufian Culture' could live comfortably in the steppe zone of present-day eastern Jordan, new research by a team of scientists and archaeologists suggests. This was previously thought to be either uninhabitable or only sparsely populated.
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Posted: December 5, 2017, 2:15 pm

Early avian evolution: The Archaeopteryx that wasn‘t

Paleontologists have corrected a case of misinterpretation: The first fossil "Archaeopteryx" to be discovered is actually a predatory dinosaur belonging to the anchiornithid family, which was previously known only from finds made in China.
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Posted: December 4, 2017, 8:06 pm

Worm genomes reveal a link between ourselves and our distant relatives

Researchers have decoded two worm genomes and found that they have several genetic similarities with the vertebrates.
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Posted: December 4, 2017, 4:29 pm

Genes identified that distinguish mammals from other animals

What distinguishes Homo sapiens from other living beings? And the group of mammals? What makes them different? Researchers analysed the already-sequenced genomes of 68 mammals and identified 6,000 families of genes that are only found in these animals. These are genes with no homologues outside mammals, in other words, they are not present in other hairless species. In humans, it is estimated that they represent 2.5% of the genes that code for proteins.
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Posted: December 4, 2017, 3:53 pm

Bronze Age artifacts used meteoric iron

Though meteorites had already been recognized as one source of iron objects, the scientific community couldn't determine whether they accounted for most or simply a few Bronze Age iron artifacts. Scientists have now demonstrated that iron used during the Bronze Age is always meteoric and he explained how this practice was abandoned during the Iron Age.
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Posted: December 4, 2017, 2:49 pm

Remains of historic aircraft found

DEDAVE is an innovative autonomous underwater vehicle developed by researchers. Now the deep-diving robot has had its first chance to prove itself in action as it helped hunt down historic test models of a Canadian interceptor aircraft in Lake Ontario. The mission has been a success, with two of the confirmed eight aircraft models already tracked down.
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Posted: December 1, 2017, 3:46 pm

More mammoth bones recovered from Michigan farm where skull, tusks and dozens of intact bones of an ice age mammoth were found

Paleontologists conducted a second excavation this week at the Chelsea-area farm where the skull, tusks and dozens of intact bones of an ice age mammoth were pulled from the ground in late 2015.
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Posted: November 30, 2017, 8:04 pm

Hundreds of fossilized eggs shed light on pterosaur development

An invaluable collection of more than 200 eggs is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs.
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Posted: November 30, 2017, 7:11 pm

Copy of 'Jesus' secret revelations to his brother' discovered by biblical scholars

The first-known original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing describing Jesus' secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered by biblical scholars. The original manuscript was probably a teacher's model used to help students learn to read and write.
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Posted: November 30, 2017, 6:38 pm

Copy of 'Jesus' secret revelations to his brother' discovered by biblical scholars

The first-known original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing describing Jesus' secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered by biblical scholars. The original manuscript was probably a teacher's model used to help students learn to read and write.
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Posted: November 30, 2017, 6:38 pm

Sea-level rise predicted to threaten more than 13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US

Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a new study.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 7:34 pm

Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today's elite rowing crews

The first study to compare ancient and living female bones shows the routine manual labor of women during early agricultural eras was more grueling than the physical demands of rowing in Cambridge University's famously competitive boat clubs. Researchers say the findings suggest a 'hidden history' of women's work stretching across millennia.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 7:33 pm

First-of-its-kind mummy study reveals clues to girl’s story

Who is she, this little mummy girl? Scientists and students are working to unravel some of her mysteries, including how her body was prepared 1,900 years ago in Egypt, what items she may have been buried with, the quality of her bones and what material is present in her brain cavity. As part of a comprehensive scientific investigation, the mummy traveled from Evanston to Argonne National Laboratory on Nov. 27 for an all-day X-ray scattering experiment. It was the first study of its kind performed on a human mummy.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 6:35 pm

First-of-its-kind mummy study reveals clues to girl’s story

Who is she, this little mummy girl? Scientists and students are working to unravel some of her mysteries, including how her body was prepared 1,900 years ago in Egypt, what items she may have been buried with, the quality of her bones and what material is present in her brain cavity. As part of a comprehensive scientific investigation, the mummy traveled from Evanston to Argonne National Laboratory on Nov. 27 for an all-day X-ray scattering experiment. It was the first study of its kind performed on a human mummy.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 6:35 pm

New interpretation of the Red Queen's Hypothesis: It's about expansion

Evolutionary scientists have developed a new interpretation of one of the classic theories of evolutionary theory, the Red Queen's Hypothesis, proposed by Leigh Van Valen in 1973.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 6:14 pm

Traces of life on nearest exoplanets may be hidden in equatorial trap

New simulations show that the search for life on other planets may well be more difficult than previously assumed. The study indicates that unusual air flow patterns could hide atmospheric components from telescopic observations, with direct consequences for formulating the optimal strategy for searching for (oxygen-producing) life such as bacteria or plants on exoplanets.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 3:42 pm

Time between world-changing volcanic super-eruptions less than previously thought

After analyzing a database of geological records dated within the last 100,000 years, a team of scientists has discovered the average time between so-called volcanic super-eruptions is actually much less than previously thought.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 2:04 pm

First evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain discovered

The first evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain has been discovered by archaeologists.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 4:04 am

Abominable Snowman? Nope: Study ties DNA samples from purported Yetis to Asian bears

The Yeti or Abominable Snowman -- a mysterious, ape-like creature said to inhabit the high mountains of Asia -- looms large in the mythology of Nepal and Tibet. Now, a new DNA study of purported Yeti samples from museums and private collections is providing insight into the origins of this Himalayan legend.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 4:04 am

First evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain discovered

The first evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain has been discovered by archaeologists.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 4:04 am

Feathered dinosaurs were even fluffier than we thought

Scientists have revealed new details about dinosaur feathers and enabled scientists to further refine what is potentially the most accurate depiction of any dinosaur species to date.
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Posted: November 29, 2017, 4:04 am

Geophysicists uncover new evidence for an alternative style of plate tectonics

Scientists have determined that a volcano and mountain plateau across Turkey formed not by the collision of tectonic plates, but by a massive detachment of plate material beneath Earth's surface. They propose that uplift of the Central Anatolian Plateau over 10 million years was caused by a dripping of the deep lithosphere. It first formed an above-ground basin which sprang up when the weight below broke off and sank into the depths of the mantle.
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Posted: November 28, 2017, 6:56 pm

How Himalayan rivers influenced ancient Indus civilization settlements

Much of the Indus civilization developed around an extinct river, challenging ideas about how urbanization in ancient cultures developed, scientists have discovered.
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Posted: November 28, 2017, 4:22 pm

How Himalayan rivers influenced ancient Indus civilization settlements

Much of the Indus civilization developed around an extinct river, challenging ideas about how urbanization in ancient cultures developed, scientists have discovered.
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Posted: November 28, 2017, 4:22 pm

Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula reveals a cryptic methane-fueled ecosystem in flooded caves

In the underground rivers and flooded caves of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, where Mayan lore described a fantastical underworld, scientists have found a cryptic world in its own right.
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Posted: November 28, 2017, 2:09 pm

A horse is a horse, of course, of course -- except when it isn't

Scientists have discovered a previously unrecognized genus of extinct horses that roamed North America during the last ice age. The new findings are based on an analysis of ancient DNA from fossils of the enigmatic 'New World stilt-legged horse' excavated from sites such as Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming, Gypsum Cave in Nevada, and the Klondike goldfields of Canada's Yukon Territory.
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Posted: November 28, 2017, 2:09 pm

Decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide key to ancient climate transition

A decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels led to a fundamental shift in the behavior of the Earth's climate system around one million years ago, according to new research led by the University of Southampton.
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Posted: November 27, 2017, 8:21 pm

Less life: Limited phosphorus recycling suppressed early Earth's biosphere

The amount of biomass -- life -- in Earth's ancient oceans may have been limited due to low recycling of the key nutrient phosphorus, according to new research.
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Posted: November 27, 2017, 8:20 pm

Sharks evolved aircraft-like attributes to suit habitats

Researchers report that shark species have evolved diverse physical attributes to help them thrive in different ocean ecosystems.
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Posted: November 27, 2017, 8:20 pm

Archaeologist says fire, not corn, key to prehistoric survival in arid Southwest

Archaeologists have found scant evidence that people grew corn around the Grand Canyon 1,200 years ago. Instead, he said they used fire to prepare land for the cultivation of wild foods.
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Posted: November 27, 2017, 8:20 pm

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Sudan’s forgotten pyramids

Sudan’s forgotten pyramids

Nubian pyramids – Bagrawiyah, Sudan – More than 200km from the Sudanese capital Khartoum, the remains of an ancient city rise from the arid and inhospitable terrain like a science-fiction film set. Nestled between sand dunes, the secluded pyramids seem to have been forgotten by the modern world, with no nearby restaurants or hotels to cater to tourists.

The Nubian Meroe pyramids, much smaller but just as impressive as the more famous Egyptian ones, are found on the east bank of the Nile river, near a group of villages called Bagrawiyah. The pyramids get their name from the ancient city of Meroe, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom situated in what is now the Republic of Sudan.

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