Archeology News

Archeology News

Archaeology News

Male or female? Scientist challenges evidence of sex differences among dinosaurs

A paleontologist is countering decades of studies that assert that some dinosaurs can be identified as male or female based on the shapes and sizes of their bones.
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Posted: March 29, 2017, 4:25 pm

Bet Shemesh Dig Uncovers 2,000-Year-Old Jewish Settlement


Archaeologists discovered eight Jewish ritual baths, cisterns and a complex of underground hiding refuges at a 2,000-year-old settlement in Israel.

The post Bet Shemesh Dig Uncovers 2,000-Year-Old Jewish Settlement appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Robin Ngo
Posted: March 29, 2017, 1:01 pm

New research disproves common assumption on cranial joints of alligators, birds, dinosaurs

Although alligators, birds and dinosaurs have a similar skull-joint shape, this does not guarantee that their movements are the same.
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Posted: March 28, 2017, 2:59 pm

Mouse in the house tells tale of human settlement

Long before the advent of agriculture, hunter-gatherers began putting down roots in the Middle East, building more permanent homes and altering the ecological balance in ways that allowed the common house mouse to flourish, new research indicates. Findings suggest the roots of animal domestication go back to human sedentism thousands of years prior to what has long been considered the dawn of agriculture.
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Posted: March 27, 2017, 9:28 pm

Rocks that tell our industrial history

Researchers have published a study in which they analyze beachrocks, cemented sand formations that have industrial waste, produced as a result of metallurgical activities, trapped inside them. These strange rocks bear witness to the impact of industrial development and its influence on the coastal environment.
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Posted: March 27, 2017, 3:42 pm

'Australia's Jurassic Park' the world's most diverse

An unprecedented 21 different types of dinosaur tracks have been identified on a 25-kilometer stretch of the Dampier Peninsula coastline dubbed 'Australia's Jurassic Park.' A team of paleontologists has unveiled the most diverse assemblage of dinosaur tracks in the world in 127 to 140 million-year-old rocks in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia.
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Posted: March 27, 2017, 2:06 pm

Using Latin to analyze other languages

A researcher has figured out why Latin still turned up in many documents in the 17th to 19th centuries, even though it had not been a spoken language for a long time. During that period, Latin served as an instrument for translating languages that had hitherto been little known in Western culture.
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Posted: March 27, 2017, 12:32 pm

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolution

A team of scientists has described the most exceptionally preserved fossil bird discovered to date, in a newly published article. The new specimen from the rich Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota (approximately 131 to 120 million years old) is referred to as Eoconfuciusornis, the oldest and most primitive member of the Confuciusornithiformes, a group of early birds characterized by the first occurrence of an avian beak.
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Posted: March 24, 2017, 11:26 pm

How chewing like a cow helped early mammals thrive

Mammal teeth, jaw bones and muscles evolved to produce side-to-side motions of the jaw, or yaw, that allowed our earliest ancestors to grind food with their molars and eat a more diversified diet, suggests a new report.
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Posted: March 23, 2017, 4:54 pm

Giant salamanders, geckos and olms: Vanishing species diversity in Siberia

Scientists have studied the development of the amphibian and reptile fauna in Western Siberia during the past twelve million years. In their study, they demonstrate that the species diversity of both groups of animals was noticeably higher in the past than it is today. Among others, for the first time the researchers discovered an Asiatic representative of the extinct frog family Palaeobatrachidae as well as evidence of a giant salamander with a length of up to 1.80 meters.
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Posted: March 23, 2017, 12:40 pm

Ancient Rock Art Shines Light on “Dark” Period


For the first time in the Southern Levant, ancient rock art has been found in a megalithic tomb structure known as a dolmen.

The post Ancient Rock Art Shines Light on “Dark” Period appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Robin Ngo
Posted: March 22, 2017, 9:05 pm

Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle -- and vice versa

New archaeological analysis suggests people of Western Roman Empire switched between Hunnic nomadism and settled farming over a lifetime. Findings may be evidence of tribal encroachment that undermined Roman Empire during 5th century AD, contributing to its fall.
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Posted: March 22, 2017, 6:32 pm

New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree

More than a century of theory about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs has been turned on its head following the publication of new research. The work suggests that the family groupings need to be rearranged, redefined and renamed and also that dinosaurs may have originated in the northern hemisphere rather than the southern, as current thinking goes.
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Posted: March 22, 2017, 6:32 pm

Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle -- and vice versa

New archaeological analysis suggests people of Western Roman Empire switched between Hunnic nomadism and settled farming over a lifetime. Findings may be evidence of tribal encroachment that undermined Roman Empire during 5th century AD, contributing to its fall.
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Posted: March 22, 2017, 6:32 pm

Under the Dead Sea, warnings of dire drought

Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans -- a possible warning for current times. Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as a fifth of modern levels some 120,000 years ago, and again about 10,000 years ago.
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Posted: March 22, 2017, 6:31 pm

Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period

Egyptologists have discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt. The paintings were engraved into the rock in the form of small dots and depict hunting scenes like those found in shamanic depictions. They may represent a link between the Neolithic period and Ancient Egyptian culture. The discovery earned the scientists the award for one of the current ten most important archeological discoveries in Egypt from the Minister of Antiquities in Cairo.
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Posted: March 22, 2017, 1:49 pm

Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period

Egyptologists have discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt. The paintings were engraved into the rock in the form of small dots and depict hunting scenes like those found in shamanic depictions. They may represent a link between the Neolithic period and Ancient Egyptian culture. The discovery earned the scientists the award for one of the current ten most important archeological discoveries in Egypt from the Minister of Antiquities in Cairo.
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Posted: March 22, 2017, 1:49 pm

430 million-year-old fossil named in honor of Sir David Attenborough

A new 430 million-year-old fossil has been discovered by scientists, and has been named in honor of Sir David Attenborough. The discovery is a unique example of its kind in the fossil record, say the authors of a new report.
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Posted: March 22, 2017, 1:23 pm

430 million-year-old fossil named in honor of Sir David Attenborough

A new 430 million-year-old fossil has been discovered by scientists, and has been named in honor of Sir David Attenborough. The discovery is a unique example of its kind in the fossil record, say the authors of a new report.
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Posted: March 22, 2017, 1:23 pm

Amazon River no younger than 9 million years, new study shows

Researchers have determined the age of the formation of the Amazon River at 9.4 to 9 million years ago with data that convincingly refutes substantial younger estimates.
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Posted: March 21, 2017, 4:38 pm

Evolutionary biology professor explains how to 'Walk the Tree of Life'

A professor discusses why the evolutionary Tree of Life approach to biodiversity education is best, to what extent the traditional taxonomy is still used and how to teach TOL using an active learning approach.
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Posted: March 21, 2017, 3:03 pm

Parasitic fish offer evolutionary insights

Vertebrates once might have relied on a different mechanism for developing neurons in the gut, suggests a new report.
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Posted: March 20, 2017, 6:38 pm

New perspective on the European colonization of Asia

Although James Cook's 18th century expeditions into the South Pacific Ocean are considered historical feats, Spanish voyages of discovery in this region preceded them. It is well-known that the Spanish, beginning with Ferdinand Magellan in 1521, explored the Pacific during the 16th and 17th centuries. Now, new archaeological excavations at a settlement in northern Taiwan have brought a new perspective on the colonization of the Pacific region to light.
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Posted: March 20, 2017, 2:40 pm

New species of Brazilian copepod suggests ancient species diversification and distribution

A new species and genus of a tiny freshwater copepod has been found in the Brazilian rocky savannas, an ecosystem under heavy anthropogenic pressure. Prior to the discovery, only one genus of its subfamily had been recorded in the Neotropical region, which comes to show that related species had already spread across a huge range when the ancient supercontinent Gondwana split apart.
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Posted: March 20, 2017, 2:40 pm

Microorganisms in the subsurface seabed on evolutionary standby

Through genetic mutations microorganisms normally have the ability to develop new properties over a short time scale. Researchers now show that microbes in the deep seabed grow in slow motion with generation times of up to 100 years.
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Posted: March 20, 2017, 1:36 pm

Icelandic drinking horn changes our historic understanding of St. Olav

After the Reformation, Norway's Olav Haraldsson was no longer supposed to be worshipped as a saint. An Icelandic drinking horn offers some clues on how the saint’s status changed over time.
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Posted: March 20, 2017, 12:54 pm

Icelandic drinking horn changes our historic understanding of St. Olav

After the Reformation, Norway's Olav Haraldsson was no longer supposed to be worshipped as a saint. An Icelandic drinking horn offers some clues on how the saint’s status changed over time.
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Posted: March 20, 2017, 12:54 pm

Human skull evolved along with two-legged walking, study confirms

The evolution of bipedalism in fossil humans can be detected using a key feature of the skull -- a claim that was previously contested but now has been further validated by researchers.
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Posted: March 17, 2017, 5:12 pm

Paleozoic echinoderm hangover: Waking up in the Triassic

The end-Paleozoic witnessed the most devastating mass extinction in Earth's history so far, killing the majority of species and profoundly shaping the evolutionary history of the survivors. Echinoderms are among the marine invertebrates that suffered the most severe losses at the end-Permian extinction. Or were they?
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Posted: March 16, 2017, 9:42 pm

Hawaiian biodiversity has been declining for millions of years

DNA analysis led some biologists to conclude that evolutionary diversification in Hawaii has yet to peak, but a new analysis shows the opposite: biodiversity on the island chain peaked millions of years ago and has been decreasing every since. On the older islands, because of crowding caused by shrinking land area, species were being lost long before humans entered the mix.
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Posted: March 16, 2017, 6:11 pm

Earth's first example of recycling: its own crust!

Rock samples from northeastern Canada retain chemical signals that help explain what Earth's crust was like more than 4 billion years ago.
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Posted: March 16, 2017, 6:10 pm

Earth's first example of recycling: its own crust!

Rock samples from northeastern Canada retain chemical signals that help explain what Earth's crust was like more than 4 billion years ago.
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Posted: March 16, 2017, 6:10 pm

Rare cricket family sheds light on extinct Jurassic species' acoustics

World-first research into the sole remaining living insects of an ancient super-family of crickets has revealed vibrating areas on seemingly unspecialized wings which create sound, representing a transitional stage between those of their fossilized ancestors and the adapted form of modern bush-crickets. The findings will help evolutionary biologists and entomologists better understand the acoustic world the now extinct species once lived.
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Posted: March 16, 2017, 3:21 pm

Pattern of mammal dwarfing during global warming

More than 50 million years ago, when the Earth experienced a series of extreme global warming events, early mammals responded by shrinking in size. While this mammalian dwarfism has previously been linked to the largest of these events, new research has found that this evolutionary process can happen in smaller, so-called hyperthermals, indicating an important pattern that could help shape an understanding of underlying effects of current human-caused climate change.
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Posted: March 15, 2017, 10:26 pm

Fossil or inorganic structure? Scientists dig into early life forms

Fossil-like objects grew in natural spring water abundant in the early stages of the planet, an international team of researchers has discovered. But, they were inorganic materials that resulted from simple chemical reactions.
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Posted: March 15, 2017, 6:44 pm

Marine recovery after mass extinction was likely delayed by further biotic crises

Biotic crises during the Triassic period may have delayed marine recovery after a mass extinction during the late Permian, according to a new study.
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Posted: March 15, 2017, 6:06 pm

New study identifies ancient shark ancestors

New research based on x-ray imaging provides the strongest evidence to date that sharks arose from a group of bony fishes called acanthodians. Analyzing an extraordinarily well-preserved fossil of an ancient sharklike fish, researchers identified it as an important transitional species that points to sharks as ancanthodians' living descendants.
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Posted: March 14, 2017, 11:02 pm

World's oldest plant-like fossils show multicellular life appeared earlier than thought

Scientists have found fossils of 1.6 billion-year-old probable red algae. The spectacular finds indicate that advanced multicellular life evolved much earlier than previously thought.
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Posted: March 14, 2017, 7:09 pm

Flies and bees act like plant cultivators

Pollinator insects accelerate plant evolution, but a plant changes in different ways depending on the pollinator. After only nine generations, the same plant is larger and more fragrant if pollinated by bumblebees rather than flies, as a study reveals.
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Posted: March 14, 2017, 6:07 pm

How cobras developed flesh-eating venom

An international study has revealed how one of the world's most feared types of snakes -- cobras -- developed their potent venom. Cobras are killers in Africa and Asia, and cause crippling social and economic burdens through the number of survivors who need amputations due to the snake's flesh-eating venom.
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Posted: March 14, 2017, 3:11 pm

400,000-year-old fossil human cranium is oldest ever found in Portugal

Researchers have found the oldest fossil human cranium in Portugal, marking an important contribution to knowledge of human evolution during the middle Pleistocene in Europe and to the origin of the Neanderthals.
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Posted: March 13, 2017, 11:27 pm

The controversial origin of a symbol of the American west

New research has identified North America's oldest bison fossils and helped construct a bison genealogy establishing that a common maternal ancestor arrived between 130,000 and 195,000 years ago, during a previous ice age.
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Posted: March 13, 2017, 8:08 pm

Rapid decline of Arctic sea ice a combination of climate change and natural variability

The dramatic decline of Arctic sea ice in recent decades is caused by a mixture of global warming and a natural, decades-long atmospheric hot spot over Greenland and the Canadian Arctic.
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Posted: March 13, 2017, 8:08 pm

Enzyme-free Krebs cycle may have been key step in origin of life on Earth

A set of biochemical processes crucial to cellular life on Earth could have originated in chemical reactions taking place on the early Earth four billion years ago, believes a group of scientists.
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Posted: March 13, 2017, 5:50 pm

Yes, she's smiling: Mona Lisa's facial expression

Scientists have found out that test subjects almost always perceive the facial expression on Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting as happy, thus calling into question a long-held assumption in art history.
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Posted: March 13, 2017, 2:59 pm

Bones, teeth reveal the harsh conditions endured by the ancestors of indigenous Finnish cattle and sheep breeds, particularly in the Middle Ages

The most extensive isotope analysis of archaeological material in Finland revealed a fragment of the history of ancient Finnish cattle: the bones and teeth showed which plants the animals fed on. For thousands of years, the ancestors of today’s Finncattle and Finnsheep survived on scarce nutrition, but actually starved in the Middle Ages in particular.
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Posted: March 10, 2017, 2:19 pm

Bones, teeth reveal the harsh conditions endured by the ancestors of indigenous Finnish cattle and sheep breeds, particularly in the Middle Ages

The most extensive isotope analysis of archaeological material in Finland revealed a fragment of the history of ancient Finnish cattle: the bones and teeth showed which plants the animals fed on. For thousands of years, the ancestors of today’s Finncattle and Finnsheep survived on scarce nutrition, but actually starved in the Middle Ages in particular.
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Posted: March 10, 2017, 2:19 pm

Dopamine neurons factor ambiguity into predictions enabling us to 'win big and win often'

In the struggle of life, evolution rewards animals that master their circumstances, especially when the environment changes. The recipe for success is: win big, and win often. Success depends on the ability to learn. Researchers describe how dopamine-releasing neurons, which produce teaching signals for the brain, weigh the ambiguity of sensory information when they assess how successfully past experiences have guided a new decision. These neurons are even more sophisticated than previously thought.
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Posted: March 9, 2017, 7:23 pm

2,000-Year-Old Road Unearthed in Bet Shemesh


Archaeologists working in Bet Shemesh, located 19 miles west of Jerusalem in Israel, discovered a Roman-period road near the modern Highway 375.

The post 2,000-Year-Old Road Unearthed in Bet Shemesh appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Robin Ngo
Posted: March 9, 2017, 7:19 pm

Discovery of widespread platinum may help solve Clovis people mystery

No one knows for certain why the Clovis people and iconic beasts -- mastodon, mammoth and saber-toothed tiger -- living some 12,800 years ago suddenly disappeared. However, a discovery of widespread platinum at archaeological sites across the US has provided an important clue in solving this enduring mystery.
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Posted: March 9, 2017, 5:06 pm

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FOOTPRINT DISCOVERED ON MARS?

FOOTPRINT DISCOVERED ON MARS?

The official explanation is given in a NASA caption stating that “soil disturbed by the left front wheel of the Spirit rover evokes impressions of the first footprint on Mars.”

Source: https://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/Mars_as_art/hi-resjpgs/44.jpg

footprint on mars

 

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