Archeology News

Archeology News

  • Etchings Found in Roman-Era...
    on November 14, 2018 at 10:07 pm

    BE’ER SHEVA, ISRAEL—Drawings thought to have been etched some 2,000 years ago have been discovered on the wall of a cistern in southern Israel’s Negev Desert, according to a Live Science report. Uncovered during construction work, the cistern was dated based on the style of the […]

  • Traces of 16th-Century Battle...
    on November 14, 2018 at 9:42 pm

    BERNALILLO, NEW MEXICO—KRQE News reports that evidence of a 500-year-old battle in northern New Mexico between Native Americans and troops possibly led by Spanish explorer Francisco Vazquez de Coronado has been unearthed. It had been previously thought the explorer and his company had just […]

  • Study: Neanderthals faced...
    on November 14, 2018 at 8:42 pm

    Life as a Neanderthal was no picnic, but a new analysis says it was no more dangerous than what our own species faced in ancient times. […]

  • Late Miocene ape maxilla...
    on November 14, 2018 at 7:00 pm

    An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a study published in November 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ansuya Bhandari from the Birbal […]

  • Miniature Terracotta Army...
    on November 14, 2018 at 12:14 am

    ZIBO, CHINA—Live Science reports that a miniature terracotta army, complete with hundreds of statues of cavalry, chariots, infantry, watchtowers, and musicians, has been discovered in a pit in northeastern China. Researchers from the Cultural Relics Agency of Linzi District of Zibo City and […]

  • Possible Piece of Antikythera...
    on November 13, 2018 at 9:48 pm

    ANTIKYTHERA, GREECE—Haaretz reports that a bronze object that may be an additional piece of the Antikythera Mechanism or a similar device was recovered from the site of a shipwreck in the Aegean Sea last year. The Anitkythera Mechanism, discovered by sponge divers in 1901, is a 2,200-year-old […]

  • Update from Greece’s...
    on November 13, 2018 at 9:28 pm

    ATHENS, GREECE—According to an Associated Press report, Greece’s Ministry of Culture announced the excavation of residential areas at a site identified as the ancient city of Tenea in southern Greece. Ancient texts say Tenea was founded by Trojan War captives after the sack Troy. […]

  • Saqqara Tombs Reveal More...
    by Robin Ngo on November 13, 2018 at 8:43 pm

    Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities recently announced that rare mummified scarab beetles as well as dozens of mummified cats were uncovered in Saqqara. The post Saqqara Tombs Reveal More Animal Mummies appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Greek authorities say lost...
    on November 13, 2018 at 2:45 pm

    Greece's culture ministry says archaeologists have located the first tangible remains of a lost ancient city that, according to tradition, was first settled by Trojan war captives after the Greek sack of Troy. […]

  • Rare fossil bird deepens...
    on November 13, 2018 at 12:26 pm

    During the late Cretaceous period, more than 65 million years ago, birds belonging to hundreds of different species flitted around the dinosaurs and through the forests as abundantly as they flit about our woods and fields today. […]

  • Ancient flower fossil points...
    on November 13, 2018 at 12:16 pm

    About 140 years ago, Charles Darwin seemed to be bothered by evidence suggesting the sudden occurrence of numerous angiosperms in the mid-Cretaceous. Since Darwin's theory of evolution implies that all organisms should increase gradually, the sudden appearance of angiosperms would have represented […]

  • Traces of First-Century A.D....
    on November 13, 2018 at 1:17 am

    WARSAW, POLAND—According to a Science in Poland report, researchers led by Emil Jęczmienowski of the University of Poland's Institute of Archaeology have found traces of a first-century A.D. Roman fort in a farmer’s field near the Romanian-Serbian border and mapped it with […]

  • Primates of the Caribbean:...
    on November 13, 2018 at 12:16 am

    Analysis of ancient DNA of a mysterious extinct monkey named Xenothrix -- which displays bizarre body characteristics very different to any living monkey -- has revealed that it was in fact most closely related to South America's titi monkeys (Callicebinae). Having made their way overwater to […]

  • Ancient South Americans...
    on November 12, 2018 at 10:34 pm

    ATLANTA, GEORGIA—Live Science reports that people may have adapted to living in the cold temperatures, low oxygen levels, and intense ultraviolet radiation of the Andes Mountains within a few thousand years of migrating to South America. An international team of researchers collected DNA […]

  • Old Kingdom Tomb Yields Cat...
    on November 12, 2018 at 10:16 pm

    CAIRO, EGYPT—According to an NPR report, dozens of mummified cats, 100 gilded cat statues, and a bronze statue of Bastet, the goddess of cats, were discovered in a 4,500-year-old tomb in the Saqqara necropolis. The tomb also contained mummified scarab beetles in sealed sarcophagi decorated […]

  • Primates of the Caribbean:...
    on November 12, 2018 at 8:00 pm

    Analysis of ancient DNA of a mysterious extinct monkey named Xenothrix—which displays bizarre body characteristics very different to any living monkey—has revealed that it was in fact most closely related to South America's titi monkeys (Callicebinae). Having made their way overwater to […]

  • The whole tooth: New method...
    on November 12, 2018 at 3:19 pm

    A team led by UC Davis researchers have come up with a new way to estimate the biological sex of human skeletal remains based on protein traces from teeth. […]

  • New light cast on fishing...
    on November 12, 2018 at 2:59 pm

    A new study has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet. […]

  • Ancient Egyptians discovered...
    on November 12, 2018 at 2:40 pm

    An ancient Egyptian papyrus, known as the Cairo Calendar, could be the oldest historical record of a star's brightness, providing a new perspective on the development of the Algol triple star system over thousands of years. […]

  • Study casts new light on...
    on November 12, 2018 at 1:39 pm

    A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet. […]

  • Egypt's newly discovered...
    on November 10, 2018 at 10:54 pm

    A top Egyptian antiquities official says local archaeologists have discovered seven Pharaonic Age tombs near the capital Cairo containing dozens of cat mummies along with wooden statues depicting other animals and birds. […]

  • Genetic Studies Attempt to...
    on November 9, 2018 at 11:25 pm

    ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO—According to a Science News report, two new genetic studies explore the complex history of the peopling of the Americas. Geneticist Nathan Nakatsuka of Harvard University and his colleagues analyzed samples collected from the remains of 49 individuals, and found that […]

  • Traces of Twelfth-Century...
    on November 9, 2018 at 10:00 pm

    EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND—City archaeologist John Lawson says he and his team have uncovered a dwelling site situated along the medieval town wall that could date to before the town of Edinburgh was founded by King David I in the mid-twelfth century, according to The Edinburgh Reporter. […]

  • Byzantine Fortress...
    on November 9, 2018 at 9:40 pm

    SOFIA, BULGARIA—According to an Archaeology in Bulgaria report, Ivan Hristov of Bulgaria’s National Museum of History and his team have uncovered evidence suggesting the Early Byzantine city of Chrisosotira may have been sacked and burned by the Slavs and Avars in the early seventh […]

  • The new face of South...
    on November 9, 2018 at 8:55 pm

    Study by 72 researchers from eight countries concludes that the Lagoa Santa people are descendants of Clovis culture migrants from North America. Distinctly African features attributed to Luzia were wrong. […]

  • After the Pittsburgh Tragedy
    by Biblical Archaeology Society Staff on November 9, 2018 at 3:29 pm

    Religion professor and BAR author Jonathan Klawans provides reflections after the tragedy that befell the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, PA. The post After the Pittsburgh Tragedy appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Experts find that stone tools...
    on November 9, 2018 at 3:14 pm

    Stone tools that were discovered and examined by a group of international experts showed for the first time that various communities that lived during the Middle Stone Age period were widely connected and shared ideas around tool design. […]

  • Experts find stone tools...
    on November 9, 2018 at 3:00 pm

    Stone tools from the Middle Stone Age in South Africa shows that different communities were connected over long time periods over vast geographical areas. […]

  • Prehistoric teeth give up...
    on November 9, 2018 at 2:50 pm

    The isotope values of food consumed are reflected in the individual's tissues. As bone is constantly being turned over by remodelling, analysing the stable isotope ratios of bone collagen can shine a light on the main dietary protein sources consumed over many years. New research uses this factor […]

  • Reinterpretation of Tulán-52...
    on November 9, 2018 at 2:13 pm

    A pair of researchers has found evidence at the Tulán-52 excavation in Chile that suggests the need for a reinterpretation of how the stone complex was used. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, Lautaro Núñez with Universidad Católica del Norte and […]

  • A toast to the proteins in...
    on November 9, 2018 at 10:00 am

    Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new, Yale-led study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It's a process that may help researchers understand how soft-tissue cells inside dinosaur bones can […]

  • New Thoughts on Chile’s...
    on November 9, 2018 at 12:55 am

    ANTOFAGASTA, CHILE—Live Science reports that Catherine Perlès of the Université Paris Nanterre and Lautaro Nuñez of Chile’s Universidad Católica del Norte reevaluated two archaeological sites located less than one mile apart from each other in the Atacama […]

  • 2,000-Year-Old Repair...
    on November 9, 2018 at 12:22 am

    EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND—BBC News reports that work to conserve a wooden bowl discovered in a well under the floor of a broch on the Orkney Island of South Ronaldsay has revealed a repaired crack. Conservators at AOC Archaeology extracted the bowl from a block of mud that had preserved it, and […]

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Sudan’s forgotten pyramids

Sudan’s forgotten pyramids

Nubian pyramids – Bagrawiyah, Sudan – More than 200km from the Sudanese capital Khartoum, the remains of an ancient city rise from the arid and inhospitable terrain like a science-fiction film set. Nestled between sand dunes, the secluded pyramids seem to have been forgotten by the modern world, with no nearby restaurants or hotels to cater to tourists.

The Nubian Meroe pyramids, much smaller but just as impressive as the more famous Egyptian ones, are found on the east bank of the Nile river, near a group of villages called Bagrawiyah. The pyramids get their name from the ancient city of Meroe, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom situated in what is now the Republic of Sudan.

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