Archeology News

Archeology News

Archaeology News

Early Indian Ocean trade routes bring chicken, black rat to eastern Africa

The earliest introduction of domestic chickens and black rats from Asia to the east coast of Africa came via maritime trade routes between the 7th and 8th centuries AD.
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Posted: August 17, 2017, 6:15 pm

Early Indian Ocean trade routes bring chicken, black rat to eastern Africa

The earliest introduction of domestic chickens and black rats from Asia to the east coast of Africa came via maritime trade routes between the 7th and 8th centuries AD.
Author:
Posted: August 17, 2017, 6:15 pm

Poisonings went hand in hand with the drinking water in ancient Pompeii

The ancient Romans were famous for their advanced water supply. But the drinking water in the pipelines was probably poisoned on a scale that may have led to daily problems with vomiting, diarrhea, and liver and kidney damage. This is the finding of analyses of water pipe from Pompeii.
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Posted: August 17, 2017, 3:09 pm

Poisonings went hand in hand with the drinking water in ancient Pompeii

The ancient Romans were famous for their advanced water supply. But the drinking water in the pipelines was probably poisoned on a scale that may have led to daily problems with vomiting, diarrhea, and liver and kidney damage. This is the finding of analyses of water pipe from Pompeii.
Author:
Posted: August 17, 2017, 3:09 pm

‘Euro Devil’: Fossil of carnivorous marsupial relative discovered in E Europe

Scientists have discovered fossil remains of a new carnivorous mammal in Turkey, one of the biggest marsupial relatives ever discovered in the northern hemisphere.
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Posted: August 17, 2017, 1:31 pm

Comparing the jaws of porcupine fish reveals three new species

Researchers compared fossil porcupine fish jaws and tooth plates collected on expeditions to Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil with those from museum specimens and modern porcupine fish, revealing three new species.
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Posted: August 16, 2017, 8:06 pm

David Attenborough gains new species namesake

A new species of damselfly from the Cretaceous period has been named after the iconic naturalist and TV presenter Sir David Attenborough.
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Posted: August 16, 2017, 1:00 pm

Seven complete specimens of new flower, all 100 million years old

A Triceratops or Tyrannosaurus rex bulling its way through a pine forest likely dislodged flowers that 100 million years later have been identified in their fossilized form as a new species of tree.
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Posted: August 15, 2017, 6:17 pm

Archeologists uncover new economic history of ancient Rome

Researchers are the first to successfully excavate the Roman villa of Durreueli at Realmonte, located off the southern coast of Sicily.
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Posted: August 15, 2017, 3:09 pm

Archeologists uncover new economic history of ancient Rome

Researchers are the first to successfully excavate the Roman villa of Durreueli at Realmonte, located off the southern coast of Sicily.
Author:
Posted: August 15, 2017, 3:09 pm

Mystery of 8,500-year-old copper-making event revealed through materials science

Stone Age metallurgical 'slag' from Turkey -- once thought to be the earliest known example of copper smelting in western Eurasia -- now re-identified as incidentally fired green copper pigment.
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Posted: August 15, 2017, 1:51 pm

Unique imaging of a dinosaur's skull tells evolutionary tale

Researchers using Los Alamos' unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done.
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Posted: August 15, 2017, 1:50 pm

New genomic insights reveal a surprising two-way journey for apple on the Silk Road

New research reveals surprising insights into the genetic exchange along the Silk Road that brought us the modern apple.
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Posted: August 15, 2017, 1:50 pm

New plate adds plot twist to ancient tectonic tale

Misfit plates in the Pacific led scientists to the discovery of a microplate between the Galapagos Islands and the South American coast.
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Posted: August 14, 2017, 2:44 pm

Meadow of dancing brittle stars shows evolution at work

Newly-described fossil shows how brittle stars evolved in response to pressure from predators, and how an 'evolutionary hangover' managed to escape them.
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Posted: August 14, 2017, 1:34 pm

Analysis finds defeat of Hannibal 'written in the coins of the Roman Empire'

Analysis of ancient Roman coins has shown that the defeat of the Carthaginian general Hannibal led to a flood of wealth across the Roman Empire from the silver mines of Spain. This finding gives us a tangible record of the transition of Rome from a regional power to an Empire.
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Posted: August 14, 2017, 1:28 pm

Analysis finds defeat of Hannibal 'written in the coins of the Roman Empire'

Analysis of ancient Roman coins has shown that the defeat of the Carthaginian general Hannibal led to a flood of wealth across the Roman Empire from the silver mines of Spain. This finding gives us a tangible record of the transition of Rome from a regional power to an Empire.
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Posted: August 14, 2017, 1:28 pm

Experiments cast doubt on theory of how Earth was formed

New geochemical research indicates that existing theories of the formation of the Earth may be mistaken.
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Posted: August 14, 2017, 1:28 pm

August 2017: An Eclipse of Biblical Proportions


See an eclipse of Biblical proportions. A total solar eclipse will be visible across the United States on August 21, 2017.

The post August 2017: An Eclipse of Biblical Proportions appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Biblical Archaeology Society Staff
Posted: August 11, 2017, 2:31 pm

Archaeologists uncover 3,000-year-old female statue at citadel gate complex in Turkey

The remains of a majestic female statue uncovered at an archaeological site in southeast Turkey may challenge our understanding of the public role of women in the ancient world. Excavations at a site near the Syrian border have unearthed a beautifully carved head and upper torso of a female figure. The remnants are largely intact, although the face and chest appear to have been intentionally -- possibly ritually -- defaced.
Author:
Posted: August 10, 2017, 9:33 pm

Archaeologists uncover 3,000-year-old female statue at citadel gate complex in Turkey

The remains of a majestic female statue uncovered at an archaeological site in southeast Turkey may challenge our understanding of the public role of women in the ancient world. Excavations at a site near the Syrian border have unearthed a beautifully carved head and upper torso of a female figure. The remnants are largely intact, although the face and chest appear to have been intentionally -- possibly ritually -- defaced.
Author:
Posted: August 10, 2017, 9:33 pm

Origins of DNA folding suggested in archaea

Proteins in archaea bend strands of DNA in a way that's similar in eukaryotes, new research reveals. That similarity hints at the evolutionary origin of the elaborate folding that eukaryotic cells use to cram their genome into a nucleus.
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Posted: August 10, 2017, 6:17 pm

Ancient DNA used to track Mesa Verde exodus in 13th century

Ancient DNA used to track the mass exodus of Ancestral Pueblo people from Colorado's Mesa Verde region in the late 13th century indicates many wound up in the Northern Rio Grande area north of Santa Fe, N.M., inhabited today by the Tewa Pueblo people.
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Posted: August 10, 2017, 2:49 pm

Arrival of modern humans in Southeast Asia questioned

Humans may have exited out of Africa and arrived in Southeast Asia 20,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new study suggests. Findings also suggest humans could have potentially made the crossing to Australia even earlier than the accepted 60,000 to 65,000 years ago.
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Posted: August 10, 2017, 2:49 pm

Ancient DNA used to track Mesa Verde exodus in 13th century

Ancient DNA used to track the mass exodus of Ancestral Pueblo people from Colorado's Mesa Verde region in the late 13th century indicates many wound up in the Northern Rio Grande area north of Santa Fe, N.M., inhabited today by the Tewa Pueblo people.
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Posted: August 10, 2017, 2:49 pm

Human bones may have been engraved as part of a cannibalistic ritual

Human bones may have been engraved as part of a cannibalistic ritual during the Paleolithic period, according to a new study.
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Posted: August 9, 2017, 6:20 pm

Ancient pottery reveals insights on Iroquoian population's power in 16th century

An innovative study demonstrates how decorations on ancient pottery can be used to discover new evidence for how groups interacted across large regions.
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Posted: August 9, 2017, 6:20 pm

First winged mammals from the Jurassic period discovered

Two 160-million-year-old mammal fossils discovered in China show that the forerunners of mammals in the Jurassic Period evolved to glide and live in trees. With long limbs, long hand and foot fingers, and wing-like membranes for tree-to-tree gliding, Maiopatagium furculiferum and Vilevolodon diplomylos are the oldest known gliders in the long history of early mammals.
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Posted: August 9, 2017, 6:03 pm

New 13-million-year-old infant skull sheds light on ape ancestry

A new discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like.
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Posted: August 9, 2017, 6:02 pm

Extinction mystery solved? Evidence suggests humans played a role in monkey's demise in Jamaica

Radiocarbon dating of a fossilized leg bone from a Jamaican monkey called Xenothrix mcgregori suggests it may be the one of the most recent primate species anywhere in the world to become extinct, and it may solve a long-standing mystery about the cause of its demise. The short answer: human settlement of its island home.
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Posted: August 9, 2017, 6:02 pm

Fruit fly mutation foretells 40 million years of evolution

Small, seemingly insignificant mutations in fruit flies may actually hold clues as to how a species will evolve tens of millions of years in the future.
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Posted: August 9, 2017, 6:02 pm

Chaco Canyon petroglyph may represent ancient total eclipse

As the hullabaloo surrounding the Aug. 21 total eclipse of the sun swells by the day, an expert says a petroglyph in New Mexico's Chaco Canyon may represent a total eclipse that occurred there a thousand years ago.
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Posted: August 9, 2017, 6:01 pm

What Happened to the Canaanites?


For the first time, researchers have conducted DNA sequencing on ancient Canaanite skeletons and have determined where the Canaanites’ descendants can be found today.

The post What Happened to the Canaanites? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Robin Ngo
Posted: August 9, 2017, 1:34 pm

Post-glacial history of Lake of the Woods

The extent and depth of lakes in glaciated regions of North America are controlled by climate and the influence of differential isostatic rebound of the land's surface that began when Pleistocene ice melted from the continent. This relationship and the post-glacial history of Lake of the Woods -- one of the largest lake complexes in North America and the source of water for the city of Winnipeg -- is presented for the first time in a new study by five Canadian researchers.
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Posted: August 9, 2017, 11:36 am

Dino hips discovery unravels species riddle

One of North America's most broadly identified dinosaur species, Troodon formosus, is no longer a valid classification, naming two others in its stead. A new discovery leaves North America's paleontology community in upheaval.
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Posted: August 8, 2017, 6:55 pm

Amateur collectors in Japan discover country's first and oldest fossil diving bird

Two brothers from a small town in Hokkaido, Japan, made the discovery of their lives -- the first and oldest fossil bird ever identified in their country. Identified as a new species, it has been named Chupkaornis keraorum.
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Posted: August 8, 2017, 6:54 pm

New look at archaic DNA rewrites human evolution story

A new method for analyzing DNA sequence data has been developed to reconstruct early history of archaic human populations, revealing an evolutionary story that contradicts conventional wisdom about modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans. They found that Neanderthal-Denisovan lineage nearly went extinct after separating from modern humans. Just 300 generations later, Neanderthals and Denisovans diverged around 744,000 years ago. The global Neanderthal population grew to tens of thousands of individuals living in fragmented, isolated populations.
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Posted: August 7, 2017, 7:51 pm

DNA from Viking cod bones suggests 1,000-year history of European fish trade

New research using DNA from the fish bone remains of Viking-era meals reveals that north Norwegians have been transporting -- and possibly trading -- Arctic cod into mainland Europe for a millennium.
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Posted: August 7, 2017, 7:17 pm

DNA from Viking cod bones suggests 1,000-year history of European fish trade

New research using DNA from the fish bone remains of Viking-era meals reveals that north Norwegians have been transporting -- and possibly trading -- Arctic cod into mainland Europe for a millennium.
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Posted: August 7, 2017, 7:17 pm

Origin of human genus may have occurred by chance

An often cited claim that humans, who are smarter and more technologically advanced than their ancestors, originated in response to climate change is challenged in a new report.
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Posted: August 4, 2017, 2:04 pm

On the early human's menu: Mammoth and plenty of raw vegetables

Scientists have studied the diet of anatomically modern humans, and are able to refute the theory that the diet of early representatives of Homo sapiens was more flexible than that of Neanderthals. Just like the Neanderthals, our ancestors had mainly mammoth and plants on their plates. The researchers were unable to document fish as part of their diet. Therefore, the international team assumes that the displacement of the Neanderthals was the result of direct competition.
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Posted: August 4, 2017, 12:29 pm

Farmers selected maize for agricultural use at high elevations

By analyzing ancient genomes of maize, scientists have found evidence suggesting that eventual agricultural use of the crop throughout the temperate highlands of the US likely occurred due to propagation of varieties with earlier flowering times.
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Posted: August 3, 2017, 6:10 pm

Farmers selected maize for agricultural use at high elevations

By analyzing ancient genomes of maize, scientists have found evidence suggesting that eventual agricultural use of the crop throughout the temperate highlands of the US likely occurred due to propagation of varieties with earlier flowering times.
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Posted: August 3, 2017, 6:10 pm

Secrets of ancient Irish funeral practices revealed

New insights into the lifeways -- and death rites -- of the ancient people of Ireland are being provided through recent funerary studies.
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Posted: August 3, 2017, 2:31 pm

Cretaceous snails conceal themselves in monuments in Madrid

The fountains standing next to the Museo del Prado are built using a sedimentary rock full of gastropod shells from the time of the dinosaurs. These fossils have revealed the origin of the stone: forgotten quarries in Redueña, in the province of Madrid, where the building material for the Fountain of Apollo and the Palacio de las Cortes also came from.
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Posted: August 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

Humans have been altering tropical forests for at least 45,000 years

A new study counters the view that tropical forests were pristine natural environments prior to modern agriculture and industrialization. Moreover, humans have in fact been having a dramatic impact on such forest ecologies for tens of thousands of years, through techniques ranging from controlled burning of sections of forest to plant and animal management to clear-cutting.
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Posted: August 3, 2017, 1:19 pm

Trapdoor spider may have dispersed across the ocean from Africa to Australia

An Australian trapdoor spider may have crossed the ocean from Africa rather than being the product of geographical separation, according to a study. The spiders on the two continents diverged millions of years after Gondwana separated, suggest the researchers.
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Posted: August 3, 2017, 12:12 am

First civilizations of Greece are revealing their stories to science

A new analysis of genome sequences from the ancient Minoans and Mycenaeans offers insight into the origins of these Bronze Age cultures.
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Posted: August 2, 2017, 5:47 pm

First civilizations of Greece are revealing their stories to science

A new analysis of genome sequences from the ancient Minoans and Mycenaeans offers insight into the origins of these Bronze Age cultures.
Author:
Posted: August 2, 2017, 5:47 pm

Huqoq 2017: Mosaics of Jonah and the Whale, the Tower of Babel and More


The 2017 excavation season at Huqoq unearthed more stunning mosaics depicting Greco-Roman and Biblical scenes, including the story of Jonah and the whale and the construction of the Tower of Babel.

The post Huqoq 2017: Mosaics of Jonah and the Whale, the Tower of Babel and More appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Biblical Archaeology Society Staff
Posted: August 2, 2017, 1:34 pm

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Sudan’s forgotten pyramids

Sudan’s forgotten pyramids

Nubian pyramids – Bagrawiyah, Sudan – More than 200km from the Sudanese capital Khartoum, the remains of an ancient city rise from the arid and inhospitable terrain like a science-fiction film set. Nestled between sand dunes, the secluded pyramids seem to have been forgotten by the modern world, with no nearby restaurants or hotels to cater to tourists.

The Nubian Meroe pyramids, much smaller but just as impressive as the more famous Egyptian ones, are found on the east bank of the Nile river, near a group of villages called Bagrawiyah. The pyramids get their name from the ancient city of Meroe, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom situated in what is now the Republic of Sudan.

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