Archeology News

Archeology News

Archaeology News

New Eocene fossil data suggest climate models may underestimate future polar warming

A new international analysis of marine fossils shows that warming of the polar oceans during the Eocene, a greenhouse period that provides a glimpse of Earth's potential future climate, was greater than previously thought.
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Posted: January 22, 2018, 11:46 pm

Kicking an old can of worms -- the origin of the head in annelids

Researchers have described an exceptionally well-preserved new fossil species of bristle worm called Kootenayscolex barbarensis. Discovered from the 508-million-year-old Marble Canyon fossil site in the Burgess Shale in Kootenay National Park, the new species helps rewrite our understanding of the origin of the head in annelids, a highly diverse group of animals which includes today's leeches and earthworms.
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Posted: January 22, 2018, 8:07 pm

Role of cranial modification in identity formation: Did head shape encourage unity and cooperation in politics?

It has long been recognized that the Inka incorporated diverse peoples into their empire, but how these ethnic groups developed historically during the political upheaval of the preceding Late Intermediate Period (LIP; AD 1100-1450) is only now receiving commensurate attention.
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Posted: January 22, 2018, 7:59 pm

The Pentagon built with mineralized microbes predating dinosaurs

A new study has found that some of the building blocks of the Pentagon and Empire State Building were made by microbes that lived up to 340 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs.
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Posted: January 19, 2018, 4:35 pm

How did a deadly tropical fungus get to the temperate environs of the Pacific Northwest?

In what is being described as 'The Teddy Roosevelt effect,' a deadly fungus in the Pacific Northwest may have arrived from Brazil via the Panama Canal, according to a new study. Cryptococcus gattii -- which until a 1999 outbreak in British Columbia's Vancouver Island was considered primarily a tropical fungus -- can cause deadly lung and brain infections in both people and animals.
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Posted: January 18, 2018, 9:24 pm

First evidence of sub-Saharan Africa glassmaking

Scholars have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a 'new chapter in the history of glass technology.'
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Posted: January 18, 2018, 9:24 pm

Why animals diversified on Earth: Cancer research provides clues

Can tumors teach us about animal evolution on Earth? Researchers believe so and now present a novel hypothesis of why animal diversity increased dramatically on Earth about half a billion years ago. A biological innovation may have been key.
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Posted: January 18, 2018, 9:24 pm

How did we evolve to live longer?

Researchers show that a collection of small adaptations in proteins that respond to stress, accumulated over millennia of human history, could help to explain our increased natural defenses and longer lifespan.
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Posted: January 18, 2018, 4:41 pm

World’s oldest known oxygen oasis discovered

In the Earth’s early history, several billion years ago, only traces of oxygen existed in the atmosphere and the oceans. Today’s air-breathing organisms could not have existed under those conditions. The change was caused by photosynthesizing bacteria, which created oxygen as a by-product – in vast amounts. 2.5-billion-year-old rock layers on several continents have yielded indications that the first big increase in the proportion of oxygen in the atmosphere took place then.
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Posted: January 18, 2018, 1:42 pm

Release of ancient methane due to changing climate kept in check by ocean waters

Ocean sediments are a massive storehouse for the potent greenhouse gas methane. But methane only acts as a greenhouse gas if and when it reaches the atmosphere. Environmental scientists recently set out to discover whether or not this ancient-sourced methane, which is released due to warming ocean waters, survives the journey from the seafloor and reaches the atmosphere.
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Posted: January 17, 2018, 9:40 pm

Chemical evolution: Progenitors of the living world

RNA was probably the first informational molecule. Now chemists have demonstrated that alternation of wet and dry conditions could have sufficed to drive the prebiotic synthesis of the RNA nucleosides found in all domains of life.
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Posted: January 17, 2018, 6:11 pm

New light on the mysterious origin of Bornean elephants

How did Borneo get its elephant? This could be just another of Rudyard Kipling's just so stories. The Bornean elephant is a subspecies of Asian Elephants that only exist in a small region of Borneo. Their presence on this southeastern Asian island has been a mystery. Scientists have discovered that elephants might have arrived on Borneo at a time of the last land bridge between the Sunda Islands in Southeast Asia.
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Posted: January 17, 2018, 1:55 pm

Ancient DNA results end 4,000-year-old Egyptian mummy mystery

Using 'next generation' DNA sequencing scientists have found that the famous 'Two Brothers' mummies of the Manchester Museum have different fathers so are, in fact, half-brothers. The Two Brothers are the Museum's oldest mummies and amongst the best-known human remains in its Egyptology collection. They are the mummies of two elite men -- Khnum-nakht and Nakht-ankh -- dating to around 1800 BC.
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Posted: January 17, 2018, 3:25 am

Ancient DNA results end 4,000-year-old Egyptian mummy mystery

Using 'next generation' DNA sequencing scientists have found that the famous 'Two Brothers' mummies of the Manchester Museum have different fathers so are, in fact, half-brothers. The Two Brothers are the Museum's oldest mummies and amongst the best-known human remains in its Egyptology collection. They are the mummies of two elite men -- Khnum-nakht and Nakht-ankh -- dating to around 1800 BC.
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Posted: January 17, 2018, 3:25 am

Digitally preserving important Arkansas dinosaur tracks

Researchers used LiDAR imaging to digitally preserve and study important dinosaur tracks.
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Posted: January 16, 2018, 8:16 pm

The Montmaurin-La Niche mandible reveals the complexity of the Neanderthals’ origin

A team of scientists has examined the Middle Pleistocene Montmaurin-La Niche mandible, which reveals the complexity of the origin of the Neanderthals.
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Posted: January 16, 2018, 8:14 pm

Are amoebae safe harbors for plague?

Amoebae, single-celled organisms common in soil, water and grade-school science classrooms, may play a key role in the survival and spread of deadly plague bacteria. New research shows that plague bacteria, Yersinia pestis, not only survive, but thrive and replicate once ingested by an amoeba. The discovery could help scientists understand why plague outbreaks can smolder, stay dormant for years, and re-emerge with a vengeance.
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Posted: January 16, 2018, 7:42 pm

Rates of great earthquakes not affected by moon phases, day of year

There is an enduring myth that large earthquakes tend to happen during certain phases of the Moon or at certain times during the year. But a new analysis confirms that this bit of earthquake lore is incorrect.
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Posted: January 16, 2018, 6:13 pm

'Rainbow' dinosaur had iridescent feathers like a hummingbird

Scientists discovered a dinosaur fossil with feathers so well-preserved that they were able to see the feathers' microscopic color-bearing structures. By comparing the shapes of those feather structures with the structures in modern bird feathers, they're able to infer that the new dino, Caihong juji ('rainbow with the big crest') had iridescent rainbow feathers like a hummingbird.
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Posted: January 16, 2018, 2:55 pm

Impact of relatedness on grandmothers’ desire to care for their grandchildren

Historically, grandmothers have been important to their grandchildren, and the help provided by grandmothers has increased grandchild survival during the times of high child mortality. However, there have been signs that in many populations, the impact of maternal grandmothers and paternal grandmothers on their grandchildren has been different. A recent study shows that X-chromosome relatedness between grandmothers and their grandchildren did not affect grandchild survival in the 18th and 19th century Finland.
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Posted: January 15, 2018, 5:16 pm

Possible cause of early colonial-era Mexican epidemic identified

Researchers have used new methods in ancient DNA research to identify Salmonella enterica Paratyphi C, a pathogen that causes enteric fever, in the skeletons of victims of the 1545-1550 cocoliztli epidemic in Mexico, identifying a possible cause of this devastating colonial epidemic.
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Posted: January 15, 2018, 5:05 pm

Possible cause of early colonial-era Mexican epidemic identified

Researchers have used new methods in ancient DNA research to identify Salmonella enterica Paratyphi C, a pathogen that causes enteric fever, in the skeletons of victims of the 1545-1550 cocoliztli epidemic in Mexico, identifying a possible cause of this devastating colonial epidemic.
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Posted: January 15, 2018, 5:05 pm

History of humanity does not require rewriting: The case of Untermassfeld

In a newly published study, researchers refute a recent publication regarding the dispersal of humans in Europe.
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Posted: January 15, 2018, 2:52 pm

Print a 200-million-year-old dinosaur 'fossil' in your own home

The digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.
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Posted: January 12, 2018, 6:28 pm

Solving Darwin's 'abominable mystery': How flowering plants conquered the world

Researchers have found that flowering plants have small cells relative to other major plant groups, made possible by a greatly reduced genome size, and this may explain how they became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world.
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Posted: January 11, 2018, 7:17 pm

Swiss archaeologist discovers the earliest tomb of a Scythian prince

Deep in a swamp in the Russian republic of Tuva, a Swiss archaeologist has discovered an undisturbed Scythian burial mound. All the evidence suggests that this is not only the largest Scythian princely tomb in South Siberia, but also the earliest -- and that it may be harboring some outstandingly well-preserved treasures.
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Posted: January 11, 2018, 2:02 pm

Turkey-sized dinosaur from Australia preserved in an ancient log-jam

The partial skeleton of a new species of turkey-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been discovered in 113-million-year-old rocks in southeastern Australia. The fossilized tail and foot bones give new insight into the diversity of small, bipedal herbivorous dinosaurs called ornithopods that roamed the great rift valley that once existed between Australia and Antarctica.
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Posted: January 11, 2018, 1:49 pm

Ancient Phoenician DNA from Sardinia, Lebanon reflects settlement, integration, mobility

Ancient DNA from the Phoenician remains found in Sardinia and Lebanon could provide insight into the extent of integration with settled communities and human movement during this time period, according to a new study. The researchers looked at mitochondrial genomes, which are maternally inherited, in a search for markers of Phoenician ancestry.
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 7:13 pm

Dramatic decline in genetic diversity of Northwest salmon

Columbia River Chinook salmon have lost as much as two-thirds of their genetic diversity, researchers have found. The researchers reached this conclusion after extracting DNA from scores of bone samples -- some harvested as many as 7,000 years ago -- and comparing them to the DNA of Chinook currently swimming in the Snake and Columbia rivers. The work is 'the first direct measure of reduced genetic diversity for Chinook salmon from the ancient to the contemporary period.'
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 7:13 pm

Ancient Phoenician DNA from Sardinia, Lebanon reflects settlement, integration, mobility

Ancient DNA from the Phoenician remains found in Sardinia and Lebanon could provide insight into the extent of integration with settled communities and human movement during this time period, according to a new study. The researchers looked at mitochondrial genomes, which are maternally inherited, in a search for markers of Phoenician ancestry.
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 7:13 pm

Dramatic decline in genetic diversity of Northwest salmon

Columbia River Chinook salmon have lost as much as two-thirds of their genetic diversity, researchers have found. The researchers reached this conclusion after extracting DNA from scores of bone samples -- some harvested as many as 7,000 years ago -- and comparing them to the DNA of Chinook currently swimming in the Snake and Columbia rivers. The work is 'the first direct measure of reduced genetic diversity for Chinook salmon from the ancient to the contemporary period.'
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 7:13 pm

In 'pond scum,' scientists find answers to one of evolution's which-came-first cases

A team of scientists report on new evidence that primitive moths and butterflies existed during the Jurassic period, approximately 50 million years earlier than the first flowering plants, shedding new light on one of the most confounding cases of co-evolution.
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 7:13 pm

Ingredients for life revealed in meteorites that fell to Earth

A detailed study of blue salt crystals found in two meteorites that crashed to Earth -- which included X-ray experiments found that they contain both liquid water and a mix of complex organic compounds including hydrocarbons and amino acids.
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 7:13 pm

New study on Neanderthal occupations in the Sierra de Madrid

A new paper describes the occupation and activities carried out by groups of Neanderthals at the Navalmaíllo site in the municipality of Pinilla del Valle, near Madrid.
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 6:24 pm

Giant extinct burrowing bat discovered in New Zealand

The fossilized remains of a giant burrowing bat that lived in New Zealand millions of years ago have been found by a UNSW Sydney-led international team of scientists. Teeth and bones of the extinct bat -- which was about three times the size of an average bat today -- were recovered from 19 to 16-million-year-old sediments near the town of St Bathans in Central Otago on the South Island.
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 3:10 pm

Earthquakes as a driver for the deep-ocean carbon cycle

Geologists have used novel methods to analyze sediment deposits in the Japan Trench in order to gain new insights into the carbon cycle.
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 3:09 pm

Life on land and tropical overheating 250 million years ago

One of the key effects of the end-Permian mass extinction, 252 million years ago, was rapid heating of tropical waters and atmospheres. How this affected life on land has been uncertain until now. New research shows how early reptiles were expelled from the tropics.
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Posted: January 10, 2018, 2:49 am

Dual migration created genetic 'melting pot' of the first Scandinavians

New genomic data suggest that the first human settlers on the Scandinavian peninsula followed two distinct migration routes. The study also indicates that the resulting mixed population genetically adapted to the extreme environmental conditions.
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Posted: January 9, 2018, 7:18 pm

Mass extinctions remove species but not ecological variety

Though mass extinctions wiped out staggeringly high numbers of species, they barely touched the overall 'functional' diversity -- how each species makes a living, be it filtering phytoplankton or eating small crustaceans, burrowing or clamping onto rocks.
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Posted: January 9, 2018, 5:49 pm

Women survive crises better than men

Women today tend to live longer than men almost everywhere worldwide -- in some countries by more than a decade. Now, three centuries of historical records show that women don't just outlive men in normal times: They're also more likely to survive even in the worst of circumstances, such as famines and epidemics.
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Posted: January 9, 2018, 3:59 pm

Evolution of Alpine landscape recorded by sedimentary rocks

Rock avalanches and torrents started to form V-shaped valleys in the Swiss Alps approximately 25 million years ago. This landscape contrasts to the flat and hilly scenery, which characterized the Alps a few millions of years before. Geologists applied digital technologies to unravel these changes in landscape evolution. They analyzed 30 to 25 million-year old lithified rivers in Central Switzerland and came out with a detailed picture of how the Alps evolved within a short time interval.
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Posted: January 9, 2018, 2:18 pm

Methane hydrate dissociation off Spitsbergen not caused by climate change

For years, methane emissions from the seabed have been observed in the Arctic Ocean off Spitsbergen. The assumption that the warming of seawater by climate change is responsible for the release of methane, has not been confirmed. Research shows that post-glacial uplift is the most likely cause of methane hydrate break-down.
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Posted: January 8, 2018, 5:15 pm

Virtually Explore Jesus’ Tomb at the National Geographic Museum

3-D technology brings Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre to life in the National Geographic Museum exhibit Tomb of Christ: The Church of the Holy Sepulchre Experience.

The post Virtually Explore Jesus’ Tomb at the National Geographic Museum appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Biblical Archaeology Society Staff
Posted: January 8, 2018, 2:25 pm

A botanical mystery solved by phylogenetic testing

Researchers used DNA testing to rediscover Dracaena umbraculifera, which was thought to be extinct.
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Posted: January 8, 2018, 2:02 pm

Chemists discover plausible recipe for early life on Earth

Chemists find key chemical reactions that support life today could have been carried out with ingredients likely present on the planet four billion years ago.
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Posted: January 8, 2018, 2:01 pm

Unusual gene evolution in bacteria

Researchers have made another discovery at the cellular level to help understand the basic processes of all life on our planet -- this time within the unusual bacteria that has lived inside cicada insects since dinosaurs roamed Earth.
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Posted: January 6, 2018, 3:34 pm

DNA analysis of ancient mummy, thought to have smallpox, points to Hepatitis B instead

A team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of an ancient strain of the Hepatitis B virus (HBV), shedding new light on a pervasive, complex and deadly pathogen that today kills nearly one million people every year. While little is known about its evolutionary history and origin, the findings confirm the idea that HBV has existed in humans for centuries.
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Posted: January 4, 2018, 8:34 pm

DNA analysis of ancient mummy, thought to have smallpox, points to Hepatitis B instead

A team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of an ancient strain of the Hepatitis B virus (HBV), shedding new light on a pervasive, complex and deadly pathogen that today kills nearly one million people every year. While little is known about its evolutionary history and origin, the findings confirm the idea that HBV has existed in humans for centuries.
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Posted: January 4, 2018, 8:34 pm

Redefining knowledge of elderly people throughout history

An archaeologist is set to redefine what we know about elderly people in cultures throughout history, and dispel the myth that most people didn't live much past 40 prior to modern medicine.
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Posted: January 4, 2018, 5:03 pm

Redefining knowledge of elderly people throughout history

An archaeologist is set to redefine what we know about elderly people in cultures throughout history, and dispel the myth that most people didn't live much past 40 prior to modern medicine.
Author:
Posted: January 4, 2018, 5:03 pm

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