Science News

Science News

Scientists produce dialysis membrane made from graphene

Dialysis, in the most general sense, is the process by which molecules filter out of one solution, by diffusing through a membrane, into a more dilute solution. Outside of hemodialysis, which removes waste from blood, scientists use dialysis to purify drugs, remove residue from chemical solutions, and isolate molecules for medical diagnosis, typically by allowing the materials to pass through a porous membrane.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 9:32 am

Clean, electrically-driven process to separate commercially important metals from sulfide minerals in one step

MIT researchers have identified the proper temperature and chemical mixture to selectively separate pure copper and other metallic trace elements from sulfur-based minerals using molten electrolysis. This one-step, environmentally friendly process simplifies metal production and eliminates the toxic byproducts such as sulfur dioxide.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 9:32 am

Scientists work to develop heat-resistant 'cow of the future'

University of Florida scientists are working to breed the "cow of the future" by studying the more heat-tolerant Brangus cow—a cross between an Angus and a Brahman.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 9:18 am

Inorganic biomaterials for soft-tissue adhesion

Researchers at Okayama University describe in Acta Biomaterialia a new type of biocompatible adhesive material. The adhesive, made from nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite, glues both synthetic hydrogels and mouse soft tissue, providing a promising alternative to organic materials currently in use for clinical applications.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 9:13 am

Biodistribution of selenium highlights developmental exposure risks

ANSTO and Griffith University environmental researchers and imaging scientists have contributed to a better understanding of how pollutants accumulate and are distributed in amphibians during the larval and metamorphic stages of development.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 9:12 am

Darwin's 'strangest animal ever' finds a family

Charles Darwin, Mr. Evolution himself, didn't know what to make of the fossils he saw in Patagonia so he sent them to his friend, the renowned paleontologist Richard Owen.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 9:11 am

Global companies pledge transparency on climate risk

Multinationals worth $3.5 trillion and financial institutions managing $25 trillion in assets pledged on Thursday to follow new guidelines for disclosing exposure to climate change risk in both operations and investments.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 9:11 am

Hydrogen peroxide protects plants against sun damage

Plants use hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) - best known for use in bleach and hair treatments - to control how their cells react to varying levels of light, new research shows.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 9:00 am

In Oakland, hackers race DIY autonomous cars—and it may revolutionize your ride

They aren't much to look at with their bare plywood or plastic frames, exposed wires and electronic innards on display.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 8:49 am

Samsung to create 950 jobs in S. Carolina

Samsung will spend $380 million on a facility in South Carolina, creating 950 jobs over the next three years, company officials announced Wednesday.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 8:42 am

Western Digital says JV partner Toshiba's complaints harmful

Western Digital Corp. lashed back against its joint venture partner Toshiba on Thursday in a deepening feud over the Japanese company's plan to sell its computer memory business.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 8:03 am

Danish shipping firm says bulk of terminals are operational

Danish shipping giant A.P. Moller-Maersk, one of the global companies hardest hit by a malicious software that crippled computers around the globe, says "the majority" of its terminals are "now operational."
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 8:03 am

Lebanon dam planned atop fault line stirs fears

Lebanon's government says a dam planned for a valley near Beirut is vital to tackle chronic water shortages, but the location on a seismic fault line has raised fears among residents.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 7:20 am

Study links at-risk orcas' failed pregnancies to scarce food

Endangered killer whales that frequent the inland waters of Washington state are having pregnancy problems because they cannot find enough fish to eat, according to a new study.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 7:13 am

Nigerian widows seek to sue Shell in Dutch courts

Four Nigerian women are taking legal action in the Dutch courts against Anglo-Dutch oil giant Shell accusing it of complicity in the 1990s executions of their husbands by the Nigerian military, Amnesty International said Thursday.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 7:12 am

Amazon Prime Day promo starts night of July 10, now 30 hours

Amazon is extending its annual "Prime Day" promotion to 30 hours this year.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 7:10 am

Sick of your internet provider? Do some research before you jump ship

We are lucky to live in the age of broadband internet availability just about everywhere.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 3:30 am

Higher IQ in childhood is linked to a longer life

Higher intelligence (IQ) in childhood is associated with a lower lifetime risk of major causes of death, including heart disease, stroke, smoking related cancers, respiratory disease and dementia, finds a new study.
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Posted: June 29, 2017, 12:00 am

Snapchat users might want to be cautious using app's latest feature

Popular cellphone app Snapchat has introduced a new feature called Snap Map that allows users to share their location with friends. Worry about security surfaced immediately.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 11:00 pm

Scientists identify cause, possible treatment for life-threatening gut condition

Investigators have discovered a genetic cause and potential treatment strategy for a rare immune disorder called CHAPLE disease. Children with the condition can experience severe gastrointestinal distress and deep vein blood clots. No effective treatments are available to ameliorate or prevent these life-threatening symptoms.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 10:32 pm

Study of US seniors strengthens link between air pollution and premature death

A new study of 60 million Americans -- about 97 percent of people age 65 and older in the United States -- shows that long-term exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone increases the risk of premature death, even when that exposure is at levels below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 10:32 pm

NASA keeps a close eye on tiny stowaways

Wherever you find people, you also find bacteria and other microorganisms. The International Space Station is no exception.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 10:32 pm

Canada: Top court orders Google to block website search results

Canada's top court on Wednesday ordered Google to remove a website from its worldwide search results, in what some experts are calling a landmark international copyright protection case.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 10:14 pm

Use Google to shop? Here's what you should know after the big EU fine

Google was levied a record $2.7 billion fine by the European Commission for allegedly favoring its Google Shopping results over other comparison shopping services.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:30 pm

Biofuel from waste: Zeolite catalysts pave the road to decentralized chemical processes

Fuel from waste? It is possible. But hitherto, converting organic waste to fuel has not been economically viable. Excessively high temperatures and too much energy are required. Using a novel catalyst concept, researchers have now managed to significantly reduce the temperature and energy requirements of a key step in the chemical process. The trick: the reaction takes place in very confined spaces inside zeolite crystals.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:21 pm

How family and friends influence breast cancer treatment decisions

When a woman walks into the oncologist's office, she's usually not alone. In fact, a new study finds that half of women have at least three people standing behind them, sitting next to them or waiting at home to help.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:21 pm

Super-strong metal made for next tech frontier

Engineers have developed a strong, durable new material to help shape advanced MEMS sensors needed for the internet of things.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:21 pm

What's on your skin? Archaea, that's what

It turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms -- and they're not just bacteria. A study has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:21 pm

Paving the way for promising treatment for hot flashes

Fifteen years ago, Dr. Naomi Rance was at work when she experienced her first hot flash. Rance, a physician and researcher, took note. As it turns out, her basic scientific research on estrogen's involvement with hot flashes may lead to a promising treatment for them.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:21 pm

Nanostructures taste the rainbow

Combining nanophotonics and thermoelectrics, engineers generate materials capable of distinguishing between tiny differences in wavelengths of light.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:21 pm

Revitalizing Detroit requires development of specific neighborhoods

Despite the relatively large number of employees working in downtown Detroit, the city continues to be afflicted by urban blight, surrounded by a swath of vacant neighborhoods. Changing this pervasive phenomenon has been at the forefront for developers, city officials and groups like Detroit Future City, an initiative with a strategic vision for the city's future.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:21 pm

Slow-growing ponderosas survive mountain pine beetle outbreaks

Slow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving mountain pine beetle outbreaks in western Montana as climate change increases the frequency of drought and insect pests, according to new research published by a team of University of Montana scientists.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 9:20 pm

Carnegie Science Center gets $7.5M donation for new wing

The Carnegie Science Center has received its largest gift, a $7.5 million donation from PPG and its corporate foundation for the interactive museum in Pittsburgh.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 8:30 pm

This year's hot graduation gift: Snapchat geofilters

Ann Beverly had eyed a set of golf clubs as a college graduation gift for her son. In an impulse buy during commencement, though, she just had to tack on something else.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 8:20 pm

How artificial intelligence is taking on ransomware

Twice in the space of six weeks, the world has suffered major attacks of ransomware—malicious software that locks up photos and other files stored on your computer, then demands money to release them.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 8:15 pm

Man sentenced for money laundering in massive hacking scheme

A Pakistani man has been sentenced to four years in prison for laundering nearly $20 million as part of an international computer and telephone hacking scheme.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 8:12 pm

Scientists develop super-strong metal for next tech frontier

The technological future of everything from cars and jet engines to oil rigs, along with the gadgets, appliances and public utilities comprising the internet of things, will depend on microscopic sensors.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 8:06 pm

Soybean rust study will allow breeders to tailor resistant varieties to local pathogens

Midwestern growers don't worry much about soybean rust, but the fungal disease has been popping up at the end of the growing season nearly every year since 2006. But because the fungus can't survive winter without a host plant, it's not much of a threat to Midwest crops under current conditions.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 8:01 pm

Study on human skin microbiome finds archaea abundance associated with age

It turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms—and they're not just bacteria. A study by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Medical University of Graz has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 7:58 pm

3,000-year-old textiles are earliest evidence of chemical dyeing in the Levant

Tel Aviv University archaeologists have revealed that cloth samples found in the Israeli desert present the earliest evidence of plant-based textile dyeing in the region. They were found at a large-scale copper smelting site and a nearby temple in the copper ore district of Timna in Israel's Arava desert and are estimated to date from the 13th-10th centuries BCE.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 7:57 pm

Mildly obese fare better after major heart attack

People who survive a major heart attack often do better in the years afterward if they're mildly obese, a study by cardiologists shows.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:55 pm

Facial models suggest less may be more for a successful smile

Research using computer-animated 3-D faces suggests that less is more for a successful smile, according to a new study.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:49 pm

Engineers design a robotic gripper for cleaning up space debris

Researchers combined gecko-inspired adhesives and a custom robotic gripper to create a device for grabbing space debris. They tested their gripper in multiple zero gravity settings, including the International Space Station.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:49 pm

In Turkey, carved skulls provide the first evidence of a neolithic 'skull cult'

Three carved skull fragments uncovered at a Neolithic dig site in Turkey feature modifications not seen before among human remains of the time, researchers say. Thus, these modified skull fragments could point to a new 'skull cult' -- or ritual group -- from the Neolithic period. Throughout history, people have valued skulls for different reasons, from ancestor worship to the belief that.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:49 pm

More summer sunshine leading to increased Greenland ice melt

A marked decrease in summer cloud cover during the last 20 years has significantly accelerated melt from the Greenland ice sheet, a team of researchers has concluded.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:49 pm

'Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions

Researchers have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:49 pm

Concurrent hot and dry summers more common in future

In the past, climate scientists have tended to underestimate the risk of a co-occurrence of heatwave and drought. This is the conclusion of one of the first studies to examine compound climate extremes.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:49 pm

Bacteria-coated nanofiber electrodes clean pollutants in wastewater

Researchers may have created an innovative, cost-competitive electrode material for cleaning pollutants in wastewater.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:48 pm

CT technology shows how blood flow can predict effectiveness of ovarian cancer treatment

Technology can provide a new window into whether or not patients are responding to treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. A multi-center clinical trial has demonstrated that CT Perfusion, which measures blood flow and blood volume to tumors associated with ovarian cancer, can provide an accurate prediction of how well a treatment is working, allowing physicians the opportunity to better plan treatment.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:48 pm

Combating chronic kidney disease with exercise

A research team is combating chronic kidney disease (CKD) with exercise. The team had patients engage in a specially designed exercise program and found that it improved their blood vessel health and exercise capacity.
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Posted: June 28, 2017, 6:48 pm

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