Science News

Science News

Video streaming pioneer Roku aims to raise up to $252 million with IPO

Roku Inc., the leading maker of devices for streaming internet video on televisions, hopes to raise up to $252 million with an initial public stock offering.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 9:50 pm

Western cities try to stop hungry bears from causing havoc

On a recent morning that was chilly with the first nip of fall, Brenda Lee went looking for knocked-over trash cans. She drove her car slowly through alleyways on the west side of this Colorado city, close to where streets end and the Rocky Mountains begin. The damage wasn't hard to find.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 9:30 pm

Equifax says 100,000 Canadians' data hacked

The personal information of 100,000 Canadians may have been compromised in a hack of Equifax revealed earlier in the month, the credit data company said Tuesday.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 9:00 pm

Threatened Amazon reserve already being mined: Greenpeace

A huge nature reserve in Brazil's Amazon rainforest that the government wants to open to foreign mining companies already suffers from illegal mining activity, Greenpeace said Tuesday.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:53 pm

If Google invests in Lyft, what does that mean for Uber?

Uber was the indisputable No. 1 player in the domestic on-demand transportation industry. And by its workforce size, passenger count and capital raised, it still is.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:50 pm

Can cycling be safer if bikes are smarter and 'talk' to cars?

Jake Sigal wants to make biking safer. To do that, Sigal and his Detroit-area software company, Tome, plan to make bicycles, or their accessories, smarter and allow them to communicate with the cars and trucks that occupy the same streets, sometimes leading to fatal interactions.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:44 pm

Giant antennas in New Mexico search for cosmic discoveries

Employing an array of giant telescopes positioned in the New Mexico desert, astronomers have started a massive surveying project aimed at producing the most detailed view ever made of such a large portion of space using radio waves emitted from throughout the Milky Way and beyond.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:30 pm

Four things to know about Apple's iOS 11 software update

Holding off on upgrading your trusty old iPhone? You won't need a spiffy iPhone 8 in order to get new maps, photos and other features with a free software update Apple began rolling out Tuesday.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:24 pm

Equifax says it had a security breach earlier in the year

Equifax, under pressure from a massive data breach, says it had a separate incident earlier this year. That may mean even more scrutiny as the company deals with the aftermath of a security failure that exposed the information of 143 million Americans.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:23 pm

End-of-summer Arctic sea ice extent is eighth lowest on record

Arctic sea ice appeared to have reached its yearly lowest extent on Sept. 13, NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder have reported. Analysis of satellite data by NSIDC and NASA showed that at 1.79 million square miles (4.64 million square kilometers), this year's Arctic sea ice minimum extent is the eighth lowest in the consistent long-term satellite record, which began in 1978.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:22 pm

Emerging disease further jeopardizes North American frogs

A deadly amphibian disease called severe Perkinsea infections, or SPI, is the cause of many large-scale frog die-offs in the United States, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:20 pm

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a phenomenon similar to an effect observed in circular galleries, such as in some cathedrals or museums, where sound waves travel across the gallery and are reflected and refocused tightly enough that a whisper on one side can be heard on the other.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:18 pm

Study suggests risks vary widely in drone-human impacts

New Virginia Tech research suggests there's wide variation in the risk that unmanned aircraft pose to people on the ground.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:17 pm

Video: Sushi's sublime secrets

Sushi is sublime. Just fresh fish and seasoned rice in its simplest form served one on top of the other, or rolled up with some veggies in a seaweed wrapper. What creates the subtle interplay of flavors in your tuna nigiri?
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:15 pm

Security cameras are vulnerable to attacks using infrared light: study

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have demonstrated that security cameras infected with malware can receive covert signals and leak sensitive information from the very same surveillance devices used to protect facilities.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:14 pm

Self-driving Uber fleet returns to service following crash

Uber has resumed self-driving vehicle service in Pittsburgh following a crash.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 6:21 pm

Monk parakeets invade Mexico

Thanks to the international pet trade, populations of exotic animals are popping up in unexpected places worldwide. One of these successful invaders is the monk parakeet: a small, green parrot native to South America that now flies free in cities across North America, Europe, and elsewhere around the world.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 6:00 pm

Science denial not limited to political right

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, many claims have been made that science denial, particularly as it relates to climate change, is primarily a problem of the political right.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:48 pm

Nine stray elephants electrocuted in Botswana

Nine elephants were electrocuted in a freak accident in Botswana after one of them knocked into an electricity pole and the high-voltage power line fell on them, a local official said Tuesday.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:33 pm

Political polarization? Don't blame the web, study says

Despite the popular narrative that the web is to blame for rising political polarization, a study by a Brown University economist has found that recent growth in polarization is greatest for demographic groups in which individuals are least likely to use the internet and social media. This means that data does not support the claim that the internet is the most significant driver of partisanship.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:32 pm

EU to launch cybersecurity 'safety labels'

The European Union unveiled plans Tuesday to step up its response to cyber attacks, including a new intelligence-sharing agency, cyber war games and product safety labels.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:30 pm

Method to estimate abundance, trends in North Atlantic right whales confirms decline

NOAA Fisheries researchers and colleagues at the New England Aquarium have developed a new model to improve estimates of abundance and population trends of endangered North Atlantic right whales, which have declined in numbers and productivity in recent years. The findings are published in the journal Ecology and Evolution.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:29 pm

Twitter touts victories in war on extremist content

Twitter on Tuesday touted victories in the battle against tweets promoting extremist violence, saying it has been vanquishing those kinds of accounts before governments even ask.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:25 pm

NASA sees Tropical Depression Norma's small area of strength

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite has revealed that the area of strongest storms within now Tropical Depression Norma has diminished.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:21 pm

What's the latest on gut microbiota? Concordia microbiology undergrads publish their findings

How many undergraduate classes in microbiology—or any scientific field, for that matter—can say they're published in a peer-reviewed journal?
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:20 pm

New research suggests Mercury's poles are icier than scientists thought

The scorching hot surface of Mercury seems like an unlikely place to find ice, but research over the past three decades has suggested that water is frozen on the first rock from the sun, hidden away on crater floors that are permanently shadowed from the sun's blistering rays. Now, a new study led by Brown University researchers suggests that there could be much more ice on Mercury's surface than previously thought.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:18 pm

NASA data shows Otis devoid of precipitation, now a remnant

Former Hurricane Otis was not showing any thunderstorm development or precipitation on satellite imagery on Sept. 19. As a result, the National Hurricane Center declared Otis a remnant low pressure area.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:18 pm

NASA looks within category 5 Hurricane Maria before and after first landfall

Satellite data is enabling forecasters to look inside and outside of powerful Hurricane Maria. A NASA animation of satellite imagery shows Hurricane Maria's first landfall on the island of Dominica. NASA's GPM satellite provided a 3-D look at the storms within that gave forecasters a clue to Maria strengthening into a Category 5 storm, and NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the frigid cloud tops of the storm.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:17 pm

NASA tracking Jose meandering off US East Coast

Jose has been a named storm for nearly two weeks now as it continues to slowly move northward off the U.S. East Coast east of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. NASA's GPM satellite and NOAA's GOES East satellites have provided a look at the rainfall and movement of this long-lived storm.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:16 pm

UK oil and gas reserves may last only a decade, study suggests

The Scottish and UK oil industries are entering their final decade of production, research suggests.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 5:15 pm

Playing American football before age 12 could have long-term health effects

Playing American football before the age of 12 may have long-term consequences for players' mood and behavior, according to a study involving 214 professional and amateur football players.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 2:25 pm

How eyes get clogged in glaucoma and how to free them

Biologists have found an explanation for the increase in intraocular pressure in glaucoma and a promising therapeutic option to rejuvenate the eye.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:15 pm

One step closer to lifelike robots

Researchers have developed a 3-D-printable synthetic soft muscle that can lift 1,000 times its own weight. The muscle has intrinsic expansion ability and, unlike previous artificial muscles, it does not require an external compressor or high voltage equipment, signaling a breakthrough in the creation of soft robots that can move independently. The new material also has a strain density -- an ability to expand -- that is 15 times larger than natural muscle.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:10 pm

Declining queen conch populations are fragmented and that's changing the conservation game

To provide a vital scientific foundation for conservation efforts, an international team has conducted a genetic analysis comparing queen conch at 19 sites throughout the Caribbean. Their findings will help scientists understand how local subpopulations of conch are fragmented throughout the Caribbean, an essential first step needed to develop effective science-driven management plans and practices.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:10 pm

Students' self-concepts of ability in math, reading predict later math, reading attainment

A new longitudinal study looked at how youths' self-concepts are linked to their actual academic achievement in math and reading from middle childhood to adolescence. The study found that students' self-concepts of their abilities in these two academic domains play an important role in motivating their achievements over time and across levels of achievement.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:10 pm

The brain at work: Spotting half-hidden objects

The human and non-human primate brain is remarkable in recognizing partially hidden objects. A study, conducted during a shape recognition task, shows as more of the shape is hidden, a brain area involved in cognition starts to sends signals to the visual cortex. The findings make the scientists wonder if this communication between different brain areas might be impaired in people with autism or Alzheimer's. Both conditions can cause confusion in cluttered surroundings and problems recognizing objects.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:10 pm

Changes in teenage parenthood

The US birth rate hasn't changed for two generations of teenage girls, but other aspects of young parenthood are shifting, especially regarding young fathers.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:10 pm

Overcoming the brain's fortress-like barrier

Scientists have helped provide a way to better understand how to enable drugs to enter the brain and how cancer cells make it past the blood brain barrier.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:10 pm

Graphene and other carbon nanomaterials can replace scarce metals

Scarce metals are found in a wide range of everyday objects around us. They are complicated to extract, difficult to recycle and so rare that several of them have become "conflict minerals" which can promote conflicts and oppression. New research shows that there are potential technology-based solutions that can replace many of the metals with carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:10 pm

Supercontinuum lasers can lead to better bread and beer

Researchers have analyzed whole grains with long near-infrared wavelengths using a new type of light source, the supercontinuum laser. The research has significance for our knowledge of food ingredients and may, for example, eventually lead to better quality of bread and beer.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 1:10 pm

Dinosaurs Laid Blue Eggs-- And That's a Big Deal

In a twist for paleontologists, a fossil nest found in China shows that colored eggshells were not just for the birds.

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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:00 am

Ancient Greeks May Have Deliberately Built Sacred Sites on Earthquake Faults

A new paper suggests the ancient Greeks viewed tremors as mystical occurrences.

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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:00 am

UFO reported near Augusta, Georgia

A triangular light configuration was photographed by a resident of Grovetown, Georgia.

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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:00 am

500-Million-Year-Old Creature Looks Like Space Alien in Re-Creation

New images show a sculpture of Agnostus pisiformis, a now-extinct arthropod that used to live in what is today Scandinavia.

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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:00 am

Biologists Just Discovered an Underwater Octopus City And They're Calling It Octlantis

Octlantis features dens made out of piles of sand and shells, and is home to up to 15 of the cephalopods.

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Posted: September 19, 2017, 8:00 am

New mirror-coating technology promises dramatic improvements in telescopes

An electrical engineer has teamed up with astronomers to improve telescope mirrors using thin-film technology from the electronics industry. They are developing new protective coatings using an atomic layer deposition system large enough to accommodate telescope mirrors.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 2:23 am

Taking a break from dieting may improve weight loss

Avoiding continuous dieting may be the key to losing weight and keeping the kilos off, the latest research shows. Researchers showed in a randomized controlled trial, that taking a two-week break during dieting may improve weight loss.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 2:22 am

Parasitic eye infection poses significant threat to UK dogs, warn experts

A parasitic worm that is becoming increasingly common in Europe poses a significant threat to UK dogs, warn experts in a new report.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 2:22 am

DNA triggers shape-shifting in hydrogels, opening a new way to make 'soft robots'

Biochemical engineers have used sequences of DNA molecules to induce shape-changing in water-based gels, demonstrating a new tactic to produce "soft" robots and "smart" medical devices that do not rely on cumbersome wires, batteries or tethers.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 2:22 am

ADHD kids can be still, if they're not straining their brains

Lack of motivation or boredom with school isn't to blame for squirming by children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Symptoms such as fidgeting, foot-tapping and chair-swiveling are triggered by cognitively demanding tasks - like school and homework. But movies and video games don't typically require brain strain, so the excessive movement doesn't manifest.
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Posted: September 19, 2017, 2:22 am

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