Ancient Colony News

Ancient Colony News

  • Toad Mural Unearthed in Peru
    on August 20, 2019 at 9:30 pm

    LIMA, PERU—BBC News reports that a mural decorated with sculpted figures depicting a smiling toad perched above a human face has been discovered at the 3,800-year-old site of Vichama, a center of Peru's prehistoric Caral culture, which originated some 5,000 years ago. Ruth Shady Solís, director of the Caral Archaeological Zone, said that the toad represented water for ancient Andean cultures, and that the mural may represent the toad bringing rainfall to the human waiting below. […]

  • Tooth Confirms Neanderthal Presence in Iran
    on August 20, 2019 at 9:00 pm

    TEHRAN, IRAN—According to a Tasnim News Agency report, recent analysis of a tooth recovered in 1999 from Wezmeh Cave, in the Zagros Mountains of western Iran, provides the first direct evidence for Neanderthal presence in the region. Fereidoun Biglari of the National Museum of Iran explained that X-ray micro-CT imaging of the premolar tooth has demonstrated that it belonged to a Neanderthal child between the ages of six and ten—not an early modern human, as had been previously […]

  • Welsh Hillfort Threatened by Coastal Erosion
    on August 20, 2019 at 8:30 pm

    GWYNEDD, WALES—Archaeologists are working to learn more about an Iron Age hillfort near Caernarfon in north Wales that is being gradually eroded by the sea, according to a report from BBC News. The fort at Dinas Dinlle is believed to date back about 2,500 years, and coins found at the site indicate it was also occupied in the Roman period. Early maps of the fort and the curve of its remaining defenses show that it was once completely enclosed, but a section of its western perimeter has […]

  • Early Stone Church Unearthed in England
    on August 20, 2019 at 8:00 pm

    LYMINGE, ENGLAND—According to a BBC report, archaeologists excavating within the medieval churchyard at St. Mary and St. Ethelburga Parish Church have revealed a much older Anglo-Saxon building that appears to be one of the earliest stone churches in England. Structural elements, including the presence of a pink mortar made out of lime and crushed Roman brick, as well as a distinctive triple arch, suggest the church builders imported stonemasons from France to oversee construction. […]

  • 500-year-old mummy of Incan girl returns to Bolivia
    on August 20, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    A 500-year-old mummy of an Incan girl has been returned to Bolivia some 129 years after it was donated to the Michigan State University Museum, marking what an official says is the first time human remains of archaeological importance have been repatriated to the Andean country.

  • Biomolecular analyses of Roopkund skeletons show Mediterranean migrants in Indian Himalaya
    on August 20, 2019 at 5:09 pm

    A large-scale study conducted by an international team of scientists has revealed that the mysterious skeletons of Roopkund Lake -- once thought to have died during a single catastrophic event - belong to genetically highly distinct groups that died in multiple periods in at least two episodes separated by one thousand years.

  • Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater
    on August 20, 2019 at 5:09 pm

    Researchers have discovered a new 8,000 year old structure 11 meters below sea level on the Isle of Wight. It is the most intact, wooden Middle Stone Age structure ever found in the UK.

  • Biomolecular analyses of Roopkund skeletons show Mediterranean migrants in Indian Himalaya
    on August 20, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    A large-scale study conducted by an international team of scientists has revealed that the mysterious skeletons of Roopkund Lake—once thought to have died during a single catastrophic event—belong to genetically highly distinct groups that died in multiple periods in at least two episodes separated by 1000 years. The study, published this week in Nature Communications, involved an international team of 28 researchers from institutions in India, the United States and Europe.

  • A Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater
    on August 20, 2019 at 2:40 pm

    The Maritime Archaeological Trust has discovered a new 8,000 year old structure next to what is believed to be the oldest boat building site in the world on the Isle of Wight.

  • Making biominerals: Nature's recipe is old, evolved more than once
    on August 20, 2019 at 11:10 am

    In recent years, scientists have teased out many of the secrets of biomineralization, the process by which sea urchins grow spines, mollusks build their shells and corals make their skeletons, not to mention how mammals and other animals make bones and teeth.

  • Scientists discover new way to reconstruct what extinct animals looked like
    on August 20, 2019 at 11:05 am

    Scientists could be set to reveal the most accurate depictions of ancient vertebrates ever made after a world-first discovery at University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland.

  • Neanderthal tool-making process may have been simpler than previously thought
    on August 20, 2019 at 11:01 am

    Neanderthals and other early humans produced a tarry glue from birch bark; this was long considered proof of a high level of cognitive and cultural development. Researchers had long believed that birch tar—used by the Neanderthals to make tools—could only be created through a complex process in which the bark had to be heated in the absence of air.

  • Merovingian Period Skeleton Uncovered in France
    on August 19, 2019 at 9:30 pm

    CAHORS, FRANCE—A limestone sarcophagus containing the remains of an elderly woman dating to the seventh century has been unearthed in Cahors, in southwestern France, according to a report from RFI. The discovery was made as part of excavations carried out ahead of a redevelopment project by the archaeological unit of the Department of Lot, in cooperation with specialists from France’s National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research. The skeleton, which dates to the […]

  • New Discoveries at Welsh Hillfort
    on August 19, 2019 at 9:00 pm

    CARDIFF, WALES—Wales Online reports that recent excavations at Caerau, an Iron Age hillfort on the outskirts of Cardiff, have resulted in a number of new finds dating to both the Iron Age and the Roman era. Archaeologists believe Iron Age people first began living at the site around 600 B.C. Some 200 homes dating to that period are estimated to have been built on Caerau's triangular hilltop, three of which have been recently excavated. A team led by Cardiff University […]

  • Millennia of Prehistoric Life Investigated in Pennsylvania
    on August 19, 2019 at 8:30 pm

    BLAIRSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA—The Pocono Record reports that students from Indiana University of Pennsylvania looking for the remains of Newport, an eighteenth-century European settlement on the banks of western Pennsylvania's Conemaugh River, have also uncovered stone debris left behind by indigenous people hundreds or thousands of years before contact. IUP professors of anthropology Benjamin Ford and William Chadwick have been overseeing the students as they excavate and map the […]

  • Roman Military Diploma Unearthed in Bulgaria
    on August 19, 2019 at 8:00 pm

    DEBELT, BULGARIA—A fragment of a bronze Roman military diploma has been found at the ancient city of Deultum in eastern Bulgaria, according to a report in The Sofia Globe. Such diplomas were awarded, along with Roman citizenship, to auxiliary soldiers who had served in the army at least 25 years. Examination of the 1.5-inch fragment revealed that it contains an excerpt from a decree of the emperor Hadrian, dated July 17, 122, dismissing veterans in the province of Lower Dacia. Deultum […]

  • Researchers discover prehistoric shark species
    on August 19, 2019 at 4:42 pm

    Two South Carolina researchers have discovered a species of prehistoric shark, along with dozens of other fossils from prehistoric sea creatures.

  • Invisible writing on antique Nile papyrus revealed by multiple methods
    on August 19, 2019 at 1:38 pm

    Researchers from the Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection, Berlin universities and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin studied a small piece of papyrus that was excavated on the island of Elephantine on the River Nile a little over 100 years ago. The team used several methods, including non-destructive techniques at BESSY II. The researchers' work, reported in the Journal of Cultural Heritage, blazes a trail for further analyzes of the papyrus collection in Berlin.

  • Ancient Bread: 14,400-Year-Old Flatbreads Unearthed in Jordan
    by Biblical Archaeology Society Staff on August 18, 2019 at 1:00 pm

    In northeast Jordan, archaeologists discovered ancient “bread-like” remains that pre-date the emergence of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The post Ancient Bread: 14,400-Year-Old Flatbreads Unearthed in Jordan appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

  • Early Jewish Bread Stamp Found Near Akko
    by Biblical Archaeology Society Staff on August 17, 2019 at 12:46 am

    In 2011, Excavators with the Israel Antiquities Authority unearthed a 1,500-year-old Jewish bread stamp from a small Byzantine settlement near the ancient port city of […] The post Early Jewish Bread Stamp Found Near Akko appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

  • Evidence of Parasite Infestations Found at England's Must Farm
    on August 16, 2019 at 11:17 pm

    EAST ANGLIA, ENGLAND—An examination of four human coprolites recovered from Must Farm, a Bronze Age settlement discovered in wetland fens in the East of England, revealed heavy infestation with the eggs of fish tapeworms, giant kidney worms, whipworms, and other parasites, according to a report in The Guardian. Marissa Ledger and Piers Mitchell of Cambridge University explained that the inhabitants of the settlement’s wooden huts on stilts probably ate raw or undercooked fish, […]

  • Humans migrated to Mongolia much earlier than previously believed
    on August 16, 2019 at 10:35 pm

    Stone tools uncovered in Mongolia by an international team of archaeologists indicate that modern humans traveled across the Eurasian steppe about 45,000 years ago, according to a new University of California, Davis, study. The date is about 10,000 years earlier than archaeologists previously believed.

  • Hellenistic-Era Tomb Discovered in Northern Greece
    on August 16, 2019 at 10:00 pm

    KOZANI, GREECE—Tornos News reports that an intact tomb dating to the end of the first century B.C. was discovered at a coal mine in northern Greece. The body of the woman who had been buried in the tomb had been laid to rest on a bronze funeral bed. A gold leaf had been placed in her mouth. “We’re dealing with a rich woman or someone who held an important position in the society of the time,” said Areti Chondrogianni-Metoki of the Kozani Ephorate of Antiquities. To read […]

  • Student reveals the face of Iron Age female druid
    on August 16, 2019 at 1:31 pm

    A University of Dundee student has revealed the face of one of Scotland's oldest druids, believed to have been more than 60 years old when she died during the Iron Age.

  • 'Invisible ink' on antique Nile papyrus revealed by multiple methods
    on August 16, 2019 at 1:24 pm

    Researchers studied a small piece of papyrus that was excavated on the island of Elephantine on the River Nile a little over 100 years ago. The team used serval methods including non-destructive techniques at BESSY II.

  • Ancient feces reveal how 'marsh diet' left Bronze Age Fen folk infected with parasites
    on August 16, 2019 at 1:27 am

    'Coprolites' from the Must Farm archaeological excavation in East Anglia, UK, shows the prehistoric inhabitants were infected by parasitic worms that can be spread by eating raw fish, frogs and shellfish.

  • Genetic Study Suggests Human Role in Cave Bear Extinction
    on August 15, 2019 at 11:28 pm

    ZURICH, SWITZERLAND—A genetic study conducted by paleogeneticist Verena Schūnemann of the University of Zurich and her colleagues suggests that modern humans contributed to the extinction of cave bears some 20,000 years ago, according to a report in The Washington Post. The scientists analyzed mitochondrial DNA, which is inherited through the female line, collected from 130 Ursus spelaeus individuals, and estimated the size of the female bear population over time. They determined […]

  • Archaeologists Explore Medieval Castle’s Cave in Poland
    on August 15, 2019 at 11:16 pm

    SILESIA, POLAND—Science in Poland reports that a range of artifacts and some 200 Neanderthal knives and scrapers were discovered in a cave on the grounds of a ruined castle in northeastern Poland. The cave’s vault may have been buttressed in the thirteenth century, when the castle was built, in order to support the weight of the structure above it. Archaeologist Mikołaj Urbanowski of the Foundation Nature and Man said the stone tools are estimated to be about 40,000 years old, […]

  • Ancient feces reveal how 'marsh diet' left Bronze Age Fen folk infected with parasites
    on August 15, 2019 at 11:00 pm

    New research published today in the journal Parasitology shows how the prehistoric inhabitants of a settlement in the freshwater marshes of eastern England were infected by intestinal worms caught from foraging for food in the lakes and waterways around their homes.

  • Some Neanderthals May Have Suffered From Surfer’s Ear
    on August 15, 2019 at 10:37 pm

    ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI—CNN reports that bony growths associated with the condition known as “surfer’s ear” have been detected in the ear canals of about half of the Neanderthal skulls examined by a team of researchers led by Erik Trinkaus of Washington University in St. Louis, and Sébastien Villotte and Mathilde Samsel of the University of Bordeaux. The presence of the growths in Neanderthals suggests the ancient hominins had the sophisticated technology […]

  • Shard of Ancient Economic Record Discovered in Cyprus
    on August 15, 2019 at 10:10 pm

    NICOSIA, CYPRUS—According to an Associated Press report, a 2,500-year-old piece of pottery inscribed with an inventory of goods has been found at Paphos, an ancient city located on the southwestern coast of Cyprus. Maria Iacovou of the University of Cyprus suggests the document, written in a Greek syllabic script, indicates that Cypriot city-states invented their own methods of managing their economies, rather than importing a management system from Phoenicia or another foreign kingdom. A […]

  • Early species developed much faster than previously thought, research shows
    on August 15, 2019 at 8:34 pm

    When Earth's species were rapidly diversifying nearly 500 million years ago, that evolution was driven by complex factors including global cooling, more oxygen in the atmosphere, and more nutrients in the oceans. But it took a combination of many global environmental and tectonic changes occurring simultaneously and combining like building blocks to produce rapid diversification into new species, according to a new study by Dr. Alycia Stigall, Professor of Geological Sciences at Ohio University.

  • Dinosaur brains from baby to adult
    on August 15, 2019 at 2:26 pm

    New research by a University of Bristol palaeontology post-graduate student has revealed fresh insights into how the braincase of the dinosaur Psittacosaurus developed and how this tells us about its posture.

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.