Ancient Colony News

Ancient Colony News

  • Australia WWII ship sunk by Japanese submarine found
    on April 23, 2019 at 10:17 am

    An Australian freighter sunk by a Japanese submarine during World War II has been located "relatively intact" in waters off the country's southeast coast, archeologists said Tuesday. […]

  • Venomous Snake Parts Found in Prehistoric Human Coprolite
    on April 22, 2019 at 11:44 pm

    COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS—Cosmos reports that researchers led by Elanor Sonderman of Texas A&M University discovered uncooked bones, scales, and the fang of a viper in a single human coprolite recovered from a rock shelter in southwest Texas. The sample of fossilized feces has been dated to between 1,460 and 1,528 years old. The researchers also detected traces of agave, prickly pear cactus, plants related to asparagus, and the uncooked bones of a small rodent in the sample. Sonderman […]

  • Byzantine Gold Coin Discovered in Northern Israel
    on April 22, 2019 at 11:34 pm

    GALILEE, ISRAEL—According to a report in The Times of Israel, several high school students discovered a Byzantine-era solidus depicting the emperor Theodosius II while orienteering near a stream in northern Israel. The goddess Victory holding the Staff of the Cross is shown on the gold coin's other side. Israel Antiquities Authority numismatic expert Gabriela Bijovsky said the coin was minted in Constantinople between A.D. 420 and 423, and is the first of its kind to be found in […]

  • Possible Seventeenth-Century Massacre Site Found in Alaska
    on April 22, 2019 at 9:58 pm

    ABERDEEN, SCOTLAND—Live Science reports that researchers led by Rick Knecht and Charlotta Hillerdal of the University of Aberdeen have uncovered evidence of a massacre at a well-preserved Yup’ik village site in southwestern Alaska, where more than 60,000 artifacts, including dolls, figurines, wooden dance masks, and grass baskets have also been recovered from the permafrost. Some of the 28 people whose remains were discovered in a large defensive complex at the town of Agaligmiut, […]

  • Eighteenth-Century Inscription Unearthed in India
    on April 22, 2019 at 9:38 pm

    THANJAVUR, INDIA—According to a report in The Times of India, local people in the village of Perumagalur in the southern state of Tamil Nadu uncovered an inscribed stone measuring about five feet long and two feet wide at the Somanathar temple during renovation work. An archaeologist named Manimaran of the Saraswathi Mahal Library and a team of epigraphists determined the text was written in a script used to write the Marathi language, which was primarily spoken in the state of […]

  • Better labor practices could improve archaeological output
    on April 22, 2019 at 2:52 pm

    Archaeological excavation has, historically, operated in a very hierarchical structure, according to archaeologist Allison Mickel. The history of the enterprise is deeply entangled with Western colonial and imperial pursuits, she says. Excavations have been, and often still are, according to Mickel, led by foreigners from the West, while dependent on the labor of scores of people from the local community to perform the manual labor of the dig. […]

  • The stone faces and human problems on Easter Island
    on April 22, 2019 at 2:40 pm

    In 1981, UCLA archaeology graduate student Jo Anne Van Tilburg first set foot on the island of Rapa Nui, which is commonly called Easter Island, eager to explore her interest in rock art by studying the iconic stone heads that enigmatically survey the landscape. […]

  • How 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' inspired the cathedral's 19th-century revival
    on April 22, 2019 at 1:50 pm

    On April 15, people around the world watched in horror as a voracious fire consumed the medieval wooden roof of Paris's Notre Dame cathedral and felled its spire. […]

  • Better labor practices could improve archaeological output
    on April 22, 2019 at 12:22 pm

    Archaeological excavation has, historically, operated in a very hierarchical structure, according to archaeologist. The history of the enterprise is deeply entangled with Western colonial and imperial pursuits, she says. Excavations have been, and often still are, led by foreigners from the West, while dependent on the labor of scores of people from the local community to perform the manual labor of the dig. […]

  • Possible Sons of Crusaders Identified in Medieval Burial Pit
    on April 19, 2019 at 10:34 pm

    CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND—According to a report in The Independent, a genetic study of remains recovered from a Crusader-era mass burial pit in what is now Lebanon indicates that even though some of the fighters were descendants of Western Europeans and local people who lived on the eastern Mediterranean coast, the Crusaders had little overall genetic impact on the population. The burial pit, located near the ruin of a Crusader castle in Sidon, contained the burned remains at least 25 […]

  • Maya Figurine Workshop Discovered in Guatemala
    on April 19, 2019 at 8:54 pm

    ROCK HILL, SOUTH CAROLINA—According to a Science Magazine report, a large figurine workshop dated to between A.D. 750 and 900 was discovered in the highlands of Guatemala during a construction project on private property. Archaeologist Brent Woodfill of Winthrop University excavated what was left of the site, named Aragón, and recovered thousands of ceramic fragments, including pieces of figurines and the molds used to make them. Such figurines are thought to have been given by […]

  • Mesopotamian King Sargon II envisioned ancient city Karkemish as western Assyrian capital
    on April 19, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    In "A New Historical Inscription of Sargon II from Karkemish," published in the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, Gianni Marchesi translates a recently discovered inscription of the Assyrian King Sargon II found at the ruins of the ancient city of Karkemish. The inscription, which dates to around 713 B.C., details Sargon's conquest, occupation, and reorganization of Karkemish, including his rebuilding the city with ritual ceremonies usually reserved for royal palaces in capital cities. The text […]

  • Daily grind: The biography of a stone axe
    on April 19, 2019 at 12:58 pm

    Tom Breukel analysed some 250 stone axes from the Caribbean and reconstructed their biographies, thus increasing our knowledge of production and trade in the period around the arrival of Columbus. His Ph.D. defence is on 18 April. […]

  • Notre Dame: the public and private lives of France's spiritual home
    on April 19, 2019 at 10:20 am

    While flames engulfed Notre Dame on the evening of April 15 and the world watched in despair, French president Emmanuel Macron told news cameras that the Paris cathedral was part of the history of all French people: […]

  • Rabbit Bone Dated to First Century A.D. Found in England
    on April 18, 2019 at 11:29 pm

    WEST SUSSEX, ENGLAND—The Guardian reports that zooarchaeologist Fay Worley of Historic England spotted a small fragment of a rabbit’s tibia bone in a box of artifacts that were unearthed in 1964 at Fishbourne Palace in southeast England. This was the site of a Roman villa whose wealthy inhabitants are known to have kept a varied menagerie. Worley said the bone, dated to the first century A.D., bears no butchery marks and appears to have been part of the earliest known rabbit in […]

  • 13,500-Year-Old Burial Unearthed in China
    on April 18, 2019 at 11:14 pm

    GUANGZHOU, CHINA—Xinhua reports that a 13,500-year-old tomb at the site of the Qingtang ruins in southeastern China has yielded the remains of a young woman who died between the ages of 13 and 18 and was buried, without her head, in a squatting position. Liu Suoqiang of the Guangdong Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology said the woman was deliberately put in a squatting posture. “It points to the emergence of the concepts of life and death and of primitive religious […]

  • Urine Salts in Soil May Mark Advent of Herding
    on April 18, 2019 at 11:00 pm

    NEW YORK, NEW YORK—According to a report in The Atlantic, Jordan Abell of Columbia University and his colleagues were able to detect a possible shift from hunting and gathering to herding at the site of Aşıklı Höyük, in Turkey’s central Anatolia region. Because the area is dry, Abell hypothesized that the sodium, nitrate, and chlorine salts contained in the urine of people and animals would not have been washed away from the soil by rain. The scientists […]

  • A history of the Crusades, as told by crusaders' DNA
    on April 18, 2019 at 5:14 pm

    History can tell us a lot about the Crusades, the series of religious wars fought between 1095 and 1291, in which Christian invaders tried to claim the Near East. But the DNA of nine 13th century Crusaders buried in a pit in Lebanon shows that there's more to learn about who the Crusaders were and their interactions with the populations they encountered. […]

  • A history of the Crusades, as told by crusaders' DNA
    on April 18, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    History can tell us a lot about the Crusades, the series of religious wars fought between 1095 and 1291, in which Christian invaders tried to claim the Near East. But the DNA of nine 13th century Crusaders buried in a pit in Lebanon shows that there's more to learn about who the Crusaders were and their interactions with the populations they encountered. The work appears April 18 in The American Journal of Human Genetics. […]

  • Copper Ingots Found in Ancient Shipwreck off Turkish Coast
    by BAS Staff on April 18, 2019 at 1:45 pm

    A team of underwater archaeologists recently found the remains of an ancient shipwreck just off the coast of Turkey. The post Copper Ingots Found in Ancient Shipwreck off Turkish Coast appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Researchers hunt for 17th century 'witch bottles'
    on April 18, 2019 at 1:07 pm

    A team of archaeologists and historians from MOLA and the University of Hertfordshire are calling on people who may have discovered 17th century 'witch bottles' during restoration work or know of examples curated at their places of work, to come forward. […]

  • New study shows people used natural dyes to color their clothing thousands of years ago
    on April 18, 2019 at 12:05 pm

    Even thousands of years ago, people wore clothing with colourful patterns made from plant and animal-based dyes. Chemists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have created new analytical methods to examine textiles from China and Peru that are several thousand years old. In the scientific journal Scientific Reports, they describe the new method, which can reconstruct the spatial distribution of dyes, and hence the patterns, in textile samples. […]

  • The secret to a stable society? A steady supply of beer doesn't hurt
    on April 18, 2019 at 10:00 am

    A thousand years ago, the Wari empire stretched across Peru. At its height, it covered an area the size of the Eastern seaboard of the US from New York City to Jacksonville. It lasted for 500 years, from 600 to 1100 AD, before eventually giving rise to the Inca. That's a long time for an empire to remain intact, and archaeologists are studying remnants of the Wari culture to see what kept it ticking. A new study found an important factor that might have helped: a steady supply of beer. […]

  • Scientists unearth 220 million-year-old dinosaur fossils in Argentina
    on April 18, 2019 at 7:24 am

    A site containing the 220-million-year-old fossilised remains of nearly a dozen dinosaurs has been discovered in western Argentina, researchers said Wednesday. […]

  • Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore
    on April 18, 2019 at 7:18 am

    Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys. […]

  • Scientists Analyze 2,000-Year-Old Remains in Poland
    on April 17, 2019 at 10:48 pm

    BAGICZ, POLAND—According to a Science in Poland report, scientists from the University of Szczecin and the University of Warsaw examined the remains of a woman that eroded out of a cliff in northwestern Poland in the late nineteenth century. Estimated to have been between the ages of 20 and 35 at the time of her death, the woman suffered from osteoarthritis that may have been caused by hard physical labor. She was buried in a wooden log with a bone pin, a wooden stool, and a clasp, a bead […]

  • Who Was Buried in Megalithic Tombs?
    on April 17, 2019 at 9:17 pm

    UPPSALA, SWEDEN—Paleogenomicist Federico Sánchez-Quinto of Uppsala University and his colleagues suggest European megalithic societies may have invested social power in male family lines across multiple generations, according to a Science Magazine report. The researchers investigated possible relationships among 18 men and six women buried in four megalithic tombs in Scotland, Ireland, and Sweden between 4500 and 3000 B.C. Analysis of nuclear DNA samples obtained from the remains […]

  • Bronze Age Cremation Burials Found in Slovakia
    on April 17, 2019 at 8:57 pm

    RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA, SLOVAKIA—The Slovak Spectator reports that 17 graves containing cremated human remains were discovered during archaeological investigation ahead of a construction project in the town of Rimavská Sobota, in southern Slovakia. Archaeologist Alexander Botoš of the Gemersko-Malohontské Museum said the burial site was used for about 800 years during the Bronze Age by members of the Piliny culture. The cemetery site was eventually covered over by […]

  • Switch from hunting to herding recorded in ancient pee
    on April 17, 2019 at 6:00 pm

    The transition from hunting and gathering to farming and herding is considered a crucial turning point in the history of humanity. Scholars think the intensive food production that came along with the Neolithic Revolution, starting around 10,000 B.C., allowed cities to grow, led to technological innovation and, eventually, enabled life as we know it today. […]

  • Meet Gobihadros, a new species of Mongolian hadrosaur
    on April 17, 2019 at 6:00 pm

    The complete skeletal remains of a new species of Mongolian dinosaur fill in a gap in the evolution of hadrosaurs, according to a study released April 17, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Khishigjav Tsogtbataaar of the Mongolian Academy of Science, David Evans of the Royal Ontario Museum, and colleagues. […]

  • Funerary customs, diet, and social behavior in a pre-Roman Italian Celtic community
    on April 17, 2019 at 6:00 pm

    Analysis of human remains from a Pre-Roman Celtic cemetery in Italy shows variations in funerary treatment between individuals that could be related to social status, but these variations were not reflected by differences in their living conditions. Zita Laffranchi of Universidad de Granada, Spain, and colleagues present these new findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on April 17, 2019. […]

  • Asian elephant outlives stegodon—advantage due to diverse diet
    on April 17, 2019 at 1:32 pm

    Together with their Chinese colleagues, Senckenberg scientists studied the feeding habits of the Asian elephant and its extinct relative, the stegodon, during the Pleistocene. They reached the conclusion that the Asian elephant had a more diverse diet, which gave it a distinct advantage. The study was recently published in the scientific journal Quaternary Science Reviews. […]

  • On American hard drives, a precise 3-D model of Notre-Dame
    on April 17, 2019 at 8:01 am

    At Vassar College in the United States, a university team gathered the week before the devastating fire at Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris to plan an ambitious project: inventorying about a terabyte of 3-D modeling data of the famed Gothic masterpiece. […]

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