Ancient Colony News

Ancient Colony News

  • Early Neolithic Cremation Burial in Israel Examined
    on August 14, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    BEISAMOUN, ISRAEL—Live Science reports that a team of researchers led by Fanny Bocquentin of the French National Center for Scientific Research has analyzed a 9,000-year-old cremation burial unearthed in northern Israel’s Upper Jordan Valley. The study suggests that the body of a young adult was placed in a seated position with knees bent to the chest in or just above a U-shaped pit that was lined with reddish mud plaster. After the fire started, the body is thought to have fallen forward […]

  • Traces of ancient life tell story of early diversity in marine ecosystems
    on August 14, 2020 at 8:45 pm

    If you could dive down to the ocean floor nearly 540 million years ago just past the point where waves begin to break, you would find an explosion of life—scores of worm-like animals and other sea creatures tunneling complex holes and structures in the mud and sand—where before the environment had been mostly barren.

  • 200,000-Year-Old Beds Analyzed in South Africa
    on August 14, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA—According to a Science News report, archaeologist Lyn Wadley of the University of the Witwatersrand and her colleagues have dated bedding in South Africa’s Border Cave to 200,000 years ago. The beds consisted of bound bunches of grass, such as Guinea grass and red grass, placed over a layer of ash. The ashes are likely to have been old bedding that was burned in firepits found not far from the grass beds found at the entrance to the cave. The fine, powdery ash […]

  • DNA Study Tracks Europe's Medieval Syphilis Epidemic
    on August 14, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND—Science Magazine reports that a new study of DNA samples extracted from the remains of people buried in Finland, Estonia, and the Netherlands suggests that several diverse strains of syphilis were circulating in Europe in the late fifteenth century. It had been previously thought that Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes the disease, was introduced to Europe by Christopher Columbus and his crew upon their return from the New World in 1493. Verena Schuenemann of […]

  • Remains of 17th century bishop support neolithic emergence of tuberculosis
    on August 14, 2020 at 4:32 pm

    Researchers present analysis of the highest quality ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome to date, suggesting the pathogen is much younger than previously believed.

  • 200,000 years ago, humans preferred to kip cozy
    on August 14, 2020 at 4:32 pm

    Researchers in South Africa's Border Cave have found evidence that people have been using grass bedding to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working on at least 200,000 years ago.

  • 200,000 years ago, humans preferred to sleep in beds
    on August 14, 2020 at 12:08 pm

    Researchers in South Africa's Border Cave, a well-known archeological site perched on a cliff between eSwatini (Swaziland) and KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, have found evidence that people have been using grass bedding to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working on at least 200,000 years ago.

  • 500,000-Year-Old Butchering Site in England Analyzed
    on August 13, 2020 at 9:30 pm

    LONDON, ENGLAND—According to a BBC News report, a team of researchers led by Mark Roberts of University College London analyzed artifacts recovered from a nearly 500,000-year-old intact site on the edge of a marsh at what is now the Boxgrove quarry in southern England. The presence of a Homo heidelbergensis shin bone suggests that a group of the possible human ancestors had gathered at the site to butcher a horse carcass. More than 2,000 flintknapping scatters, found in eight separate areas […]

  • Volunteers Spot Iron Age Hillfort in Southern England
    on August 13, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    CHILTERN HILLS, ENGLAND—According to a BBC News report, volunteers with the Beacons of the Past project identified the possible site of an Iron Age hillfort covered with trees and foliage in lidar images of the southern Chiltern Hills, a chalk escarpment stretching 45 miles across southern England. “Although one can never be certain of the age of a prehistoric earthwork without excavating for dating evidence, visual inspection of the rampart and ditch, paired with its location, dominating […]

  • 2,000-Year-Old Burials Uncovered in Iran
    on August 13, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    ISFAHAN, IRAN—The Tehran Times reports that archaeologist Alireza Jafari-Zand and his colleagues have uncovered the remains of a teenage girl who was buried during the second Parthian era, between 247 B.C. and A.D. 224, at the site of Tepe Ashraf in central Iran. The girl’s poorly preserved remains were found next to a platform on which a large jar and part of a horse’s spinal cord were found. Last month, the excavation team unearthed the remains of a woman in a nearby tomb dated to the […]

  • New York Construction Reveals Section of Erie Canal
    on August 13, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    UTICA, NEW YORK—The Times Telegram reports that road construction in New York’s Mohawk Valley has uncovered a section of the Erie Canal, a waterway that once connected New York City to the Great Lakes. Archaeologist David Staley said State Route 5S essentially follows the path of the section of the old canal under investigation. The excavation team, he explained, has recovered early twentieth-century artifacts tossed into this part of the canal when it was filled in 1922, in addition to the […]

  • Syphilis may have spread through Europe before Columbus
    on August 13, 2020 at 6:23 pm

    Columbus brought syphilis to Europe -- or did he? A recent study now indicates that Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century. In addition, researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown pathogen causing a related disease. The predecessor of syphilis and its related diseases could be over 2,500 years old.

  • Fossilised 429-mln-year-old eye mirrors modern insect vision
    on August 13, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    An exquisitely well preserved 429-million-year-old eye from a marine creature that went extinct before dinosaurs even existed had vision comparable to modern-day bees and dragonflies, researchers said Thursday.

  • Ancient genomes suggest woolly rhinos went extinct due to climate change, not overhunting
    on August 13, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    The extinction of prehistoric megafauna like the woolly mammoth, cave lion, and woolly rhinoceros at the end of the last ice age has often been attributed to the spread of early humans across the globe. Although overhunting led to the demise of some species, a study appearing August 13 in the journal Current Biology found that the extinction of the woolly rhinoceros may have had a different cause: climate change. By sequencing ancient DNA from 14 of these megaherbivores, researchers found that […]

  • Boxgrove: How we found Europe's oldest bone tools, and what we learned about their makers
    on August 13, 2020 at 1:20 pm

    Boxgrove in Sussex, England, is an iconic, old stone age site. This is where the oldest human remains in Britain have been discovered—fossils of Homo heidelbergensis. Part of an exceptionally preserved 26km-wide ancient landscape of stone, it provides a virtually untouched record of early humans almost half a million years ago.

  • Got your bag? The critical place of mobile containers in human evolution
    on August 13, 2020 at 12:40 pm

    Today, bags are everywhere—from cheap canvas ones at the supermarket to designer handbags costing up to US$2,000,000.

  • From cave art to climate chaos: How a new carbon dating timeline is changing our view of history
    on August 13, 2020 at 12:40 pm

    Geological and archeological records offer important insights into what seems to be an increasingly uncertain future.

  • Medieval Bridges, Artifacts Found in a Polish Lake
    on August 12, 2020 at 9:30 pm

    POZNAŃ, POLAND—According to a report in The First News, archaeologists from Nicolaus Copernicus University and the Museum of the First Piast at Lednica used photogrammetry to map the bottom of west-central Poland’s Lake Lednica, which is located between the city of Gniezno, site of the country’s first capital, and Poznań, the seat of the country’s first Christian bishop. The study revealed the remains of wooden shore fortifications dated to the time of Duke Mieszko I, who ruled Poland […]

  • Historic Cobbled Street Uncovered in Cuba
    on August 12, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    TRINIDAD, CUBA—Escambray reports that a section of cobbled road has been unearthed in central Cuba by a team of researchers led by archaeologist Leonel Delgado Ceballo. The nineteenth-century road once connected what are now the ruins of the eighteenth-century Spanish military hospital known as Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria de La Popa Hermitage to the town of Trinidad, Ceballo explained. The road was flanked by sidewalks made of clay slabs and protected by masonry walls. The team members […]

  • Paintings of Buddhist Saints Revealed in Japan
    on August 12, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    KORA, JAPAN—The Asahi Shimbun reports that researchers including Noriaki Ajima of Hiroshima University and Yukari Takama of Osaka Kyoiku University used infrared technology to photograph two columns in the main hall at Saimyoji temple. The main hall structure was built in the early thirteenth century. The photographs revealed four images of Buddhist saints on each of the columns, which stand on either side of a “shumidan” platform bearing an altar and many statues in the center of the […]

  • Cache of 14th-Century Coins Discovered in Czech Republic
    on August 12, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    PLZEŇ, CZECH REPUBLIC—Radio Prague International reports that hundreds of fourteenth-century coins were discovered in the western Czech Republic, near the Kladruby Monastery, by a couple out for a walk. “As they were walking through the forest, they spotted a few coins, two made of gold and one of silver, lying on the ground,” explained archaeologist Milan Metlička of the Museum of West Bohemia. “They were probably dug up by some forest animals, most likely by wild pigs.” The couple […]

  • The oldest known cremation in the Near East dates to 7000 BC
    on August 12, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Ancient people in the Near East had begun the practice of intentionally cremating their dead by the beginning of the 7th millennium BC, according to a new study.

  • The oldest known cremation in the near east dates to 7000 BC
    on August 12, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    Ancient people in the Near East had begun the practice of intentionally cremating their dead by the beginning of the 7th millennium BC, according to a study published August 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fanny Bocquentin of the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and colleagues.

  • Researchers unlock secrets of the past with new international carbon dating standard
    on August 12, 2020 at 4:44 pm

    Radiocarbon dating is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists improved the technique for assessing the age of historical objects.

  • Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years
    on August 12, 2020 at 3:53 pm

    Archaeologists have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia. The evidence of cultivation and plant management dates back 2,145 years and was found at Wagadagam on the tiny island of Mabuyag in the western Torres Strait.

  • Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years
    on August 12, 2020 at 2:53 pm

    Archaeologists at The Australian National University (ANU) have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia.

  • Ancient crested penguin fossil found in New Zealand
    on August 12, 2020 at 1:03 pm

    A team of researchers from New Zealand and the U.S. is reporting on the discovery of unearthed 3.36-million-year-old crested penguin fossils found on New Zealand's North Island. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes the find and why they believe it could provide a link with modern penguins.

  • Ancient North American reptiles lived on an island archipelago in South Wales
    on August 12, 2020 at 1:01 pm

    A recent study led by the University of Bristol has uncovered fossils of dwarf reptiles that lived in South Wales 205 million years ago and were closely related to North American animals that lived 15 million years earlier.

  • New species of dinosaur discovered on Isle of Wight
    on August 12, 2020 at 7:28 am

    A new study by Palaeontologists at the University of Southampton suggests four bones recently found on the Isle of Wight belong to new species of theropod dinosaur, the group that includes Tyrannosaurus rex and modern-day birds.

  • Eating out was a very social matter for early humans
    on August 12, 2020 at 7:25 am

    A half-a-million-year-old internationally significant archeological site in Sussex, England, offers unprecedented insights into the life of a poorly understood extinct human species, according to new UCL research.

  • Intact 3,000-Year-Old Horse Harness Unearthed in Scotland
    on August 11, 2020 at 9:30 pm

    PEEBLES, SCOTLAND—BBC News reports that metal detectorist Mariusz Stepien discovered a hoard of Bronze Age artifacts in southern Scotland. “I was over the moon, actually shaking with happiness,” Stepien said of the find. The archaeologists who excavated the site recovered an intact horse harness, complete with leather straps, rings, and buckles; a sword in its scabbard; chariot wheel axle caps; and a rattle pendant thought to have been hung from the harness for decoration. “There is […]

  • 2,000-Year-Old Evidence of Cultivated Bananas Identified
    on August 11, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA—Evidence of banana cultivation some 2,000 years ago has been found on Mabuiag Island, which is located in the Torres Strait, between the tip of northern Australia and the island of New Guinea, according to a Cosmos Magazine report. With the permission of the island's Goemulgal community, a team led by Robert Williams of the University of Sydney examined soil from an ancient agricultural site at Wagadagam and found thousands of microscopic fossilized starch grains and banana […]

  • Researchers Survey “Armenian Stonehenge”
    on August 11, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    YEREVAN, ARMENIA—Public Radio of Armenia reports that 30 previously undocumented stones were discovered at a prehistoric monument known as Carahunge or Zorats Karer during a survey conducted by researchers from the Byurakan Observatory and the Armenian National University of Architecture and Construction. Located on a mountain plateau in southern Armenia, Carahunge is made up of at least 223 stones marked with holes, burial cists, and standing stones. The researchers measured the stones, […]

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.