Ancient Colony News

Ancient Colony News

  • Famed Egyptian archaeologist reveals details of ancient city
    on April 11, 2021 at 4:26 pm

    Egypt's best-known archaeologist on Saturday revealed further details on a Pharaonic city recently found in the southern province of Luxor.

  • 1,600-Year-Old Industrial Kiln Site Mapped in Poland
    on April 9, 2021 at 9:30 pm

    WRZĘPIA, POLAND—Some 130 kilns have been mapped with a magnetometer at a 12-acre industrial site in southern Poland, according to a Science in Poland report. Archaeologist Jan Bulas said that two of the kilns, where food storage vessels made on potter’s wheels were fired between the late third and the fifth century A.D., have been excavated. “The site in Wrzępia is unique for many reasons,” he said. “It should be emphasized that in the light of current knowledge it is not only the […]

  • DNA Analysis Detects 17th-Century Relationship
    on April 9, 2021 at 9:00 pm

    LUND, SWEDEN—According to a statement released by Lund University, scientists have analyzed DNA obtained from the well-preserved remains of Bishop Peder Winstrup, who died in 1679, and small bones found in a linen bundle placed between his legs. Examination of the bones and comparison of the genetic material revealed that the small bones belonged to a male fetus that was stillborn at about five or six months' gestation. He shared about 25 percent of his genes with Winstrup, including a […]

  • Egypt’s “Lost Golden City” Discovered in Luxor
    on April 9, 2021 at 8:30 pm

    CAIRO, EGYPT—Ahram Online reports that mudbrick walls unearthed on Luxor’s West Bank have been identified by a team led by Egyptologist Zahi Hawass as the remains of a 3,400-year-old city built by Amenhotep III (r. ca. 1390–1352 B.C.). Historical references to the city suggest it was home to three of the pharaoh’s palaces and served as his administrative and industrial center. Rings, scarabs, colorful pottery, and tools for spinning and weaving were found within the well-preserved […]

  • New Thoughts on the Paleolithic Diet
    on April 9, 2021 at 8:00 pm

    TEL AVIV, ISRAEL—Early humans were apex predators who ate mostly meat for a period of two million years, according to a statement released by Tel Aviv University. Miki Ben-Dor and Ran Barkai of Tel Aviv University and researcher Raphael Sirtoli reconstructed the Paleolithic diet through an examination of current metabolism, genetics, and physical build, and a variety of scientific disciplines, suggesting that even though human behavior changes rapidly, our bodies evolve slowly. Ben-Dor […]

  • NEW ZEALAND
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:42 pm

    NEW ZEALAND: Radiocarbon dating of ancient kauri trees preserved in the wetlands of Ngawha helped pinpoint the date of the mysterious Laschamp excursion, when the earth’s magnetic north and south poles temporarily swapped position 42,000 years ago. Researchers propose that this phenomenon led to drastic changes in climate and an increase in solar and cosmic radiation. They theorize that this may have led people to create more rock art as they increasingly sought protection in caves.

  • Artifact
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:40 pm

    What is it? Wind instrument Culture Magdalenian Date ca. 16,000 B.C. Material Sea snail shell (Charonia lampas) Found Marsoulas Cave, France Dimensions 12.2 inches by 7.5 inches, weight 2.7 pounds                           Everyone who lives or vacations near the ocean has gone on an early morning beach walk to collect shells and, thinking they have found a perfectly intact specimen, bent over and plucked it from the sand, only to find the top broken […]

  • Where the World Was Born
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:38 pm

    Along the northern coast of Australia’s Arnhem Land, the Alligator Rivers wind among towering sandstone outcrops, forming a maze of estuaries that eventually empty into the Timor Sea. Kangaroos hop alongside fish-filled rivers, through tropical savannas, and into thick forests of eucalyptus where dingoes, lizards, wallabies, pythons, and more than 100 species of birds make their home. Entwined with the natural landscape, evocative images of both animals and people painted on rocky crags and […]

  • AUSTRALIA
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:34 pm

    AUSTRALIA: In some cultures, insects are an important dietary source of protein, fat, and vitamins. Europeans who first settled Australia in the 19th century recorded how Aboriginal groups gathered annually in the Australian Alps to collect large numbers of migratory bogong moths. Moth residue on a recently excavated grinding tool from Cloggs Cave shows that this practice dates back at least 2,000 years. Researchers believe the tool was used to process the insects into cakes that could be […]

  • ISRAEL
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:33 pm

    ISRAEL: A mosque dating to the earliest decades of Islam was identified in the city of Tiberias, near the Sea of Galilee. Researchers believe it dates to around A.D. 670, just a generation after the death of the prophet Muhammad. Tiberias was founded by the Romans in the 1st century A.D. and conquered by Muslim forces in A.D. 635. Because most other mosques from this period are still in use and therefore can’t be excavated, this new discovery will provide archaeologists with an unprecedented […]

  • EGYPT
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:33 pm

    EGYPT: Sixteen rock-cut tombs containing mummies dating to the Greco-Roman era were discovered at Taposiris Magna, near Alexandria. The sacred city was established in the 3rd century B.C. and was an important site for the worship of Osiris, the Egyptian god of the dead and the underworld. Two of the mummies were found with tongue-shaped, gold-covered amulets placed in their mouths, which experts believe were meant to help ensure that the deceased would be able to speak with Osiris in the […]

  • POLAND
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:32 pm

    POLAND: After a lengthy search, Polish authorities have found the remains of 7 nuns who were murdered by Soviet soldiers near the end of World War II, after the Red Army drove the Nazis out of Poland. The nuns died particularly violent deaths in Orneta, Olsztyn, and Gdansk while defending themselves and the hospitalized patients they cared for. The nuns’ graves were identified by religious objects found in them, including rosaries, crucifixes, and medals of Saint Catherine of Alexandria, to […]

  • ITALY
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:31 pm

    ITALY: It is no surprise that the Roman emperor Hadrian dined in style, especially at his sprawling 200-acre villa outside Rome, which he built in the 2nd century A.D. A luxurious dining room was recently uncovered within the 30-building complex. The excavators believe that the emperor and his wife ate breakfast in the space, lounging on a raised marble platform that hovered above a pool of water. This breakfast niche was surrounded by fountains and offered views of the lush gardens outside.

  • BRAZIL
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:30 pm

    BRAZIL: Experts have long underestimated how important sharks were to the precolonial Indigenous communities of coastal Brazil. It was once thought that shark remains found at some archaeological sites were serendipitously sourced from beached or wounded animals. However, new research on Santa Catarina Island indicates that earlier than the 16th century, coastal groups were skilled shark hunters, actively fishing a variety of species. Shark meat was a major part of the local diet, while shark […]

  • MEXICO
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:30 pm

    MEXICO: A relief depicting a golden eagle emerged from excavations near the base of the Templo Mayor in the ancient Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan. The ornate 15th-century carving once decorated the floor of a plaza below the city’s most important religious structure, which was dedicated to the worship of the gods Huitzilopochtli and Tlaloc. For the Aztecs, golden eagles were sacred creatures that had a particularly close association with Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war.

  • CALIFORNIA
    on April 9, 2021 at 7:29 pm

    CALIFORNIA: New research suggests that the Chumash people of California’s south-central coast were using standardized shell beads as currency 2,000 years ago—some 800 years earlier than originally believed. This may constitute the earliest known example of the use of money in the Americas. It has been assumed that hunter-gatherer societies such as the Chumash had no need for money, but the new theory proposes that these groups were more sociopolitically and economically complex than once […]

  • Archeologists unearth an ancient pharaonic city in Egypt
    on April 9, 2021 at 1:37 pm

    Egyptian archeologists have unearthed a 3,000-year-old lost city, complete with mud brick houses, artifacts, and tools from pharaonic times.

  • Research identifies new cultural threads in Goldfield early settlers
    on April 9, 2021 at 1:26 pm

    University of Otago research analyzing skeletal remains has found evidence of a range of ethnicities present on the Goldfields of Otago, proving some assumptions of the cultural make-up of early settler New Zealand to be inaccurate.

  • Paper urges archaeologists and historians to work closely with people who are grappling with racism...
    on April 8, 2021 at 8:24 pm

    When most Americans imagine an archaeologist, they picture someone who looks like Indiana Jones. Or, perhaps, Lara Croft, from the Tomb Raider game. White, usually male but occasionally female, digging up the spoils of a vanished culture in colonized lands.

  • Archaeologists uncover earliest evidence of domesticated dogs in Arabian Peninsula
    on April 8, 2021 at 6:24 pm

    A team of archaeologists in north-west the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has uncovered the earliest evidence of dog domestication by the region's ancient inhabitants.

  • Early dispersal of neolithic domesticated sheep into the heart of central Asia
    on April 8, 2021 at 3:23 pm

    Along the Tian Shan and Alay mountain ranges of Central Asia, sheep and other domestic livestock form the core economy of contemporary life. Although it was here that the movements of their ancient predecessors helped to shape the great trade networks of the Silk Road, domestic animals were thought to have come relatively late to the region. A new study reveals that the roots of animal domestication in Central Asia stretch back at least 8,000 years -- making the region one of the oldest […]

  • Early dispersal of neolithic domesticated sheep into the heart of central Asia
    on April 8, 2021 at 3:00 pm

    Along the Tian Shan and Alay mountain ranges of Central Asia, sheep and other domestic livestock form the core economy of contemporary life. Although it was here that the movements of their ancient predecessors helped to shape the great trade networks of the Silk Road, domestic animals were thought to have come relatively late to the region. A new study, published today in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, reveals that the roots of animal domestication in Central Asia stretch back at least […]

  • French 4,000-year-old carving is oldest map in Europe: study
    on April 8, 2021 at 2:11 pm

    A Bronze-age slab first uncovered in 1900 in western France is the oldest map in Europe, according to a study released this week.

  • Scant evidence that 'wood overuse' at Cahokia caused local flooding, subsequent collapse
    on April 8, 2021 at 1:52 pm

    Whatever ultimately caused inhabitants to abandon Cahokia, it was not because they cut down too many trees, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

  • Foetus in bishop's coffin was probably his grandson
    on April 7, 2021 at 4:26 pm

    Bishop Peder Winstrup died in 1679, and is one of the most well-preserved human bodies from the 1600s. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden may now have solved the mystery of why a fetus was hidden in his coffin in Lund Cathedral. DNA from the bishop and the fetus, along with kinship analyses, has shown that the child was probably the bishop's own grandson.

  • 800-year-old medieval pottery fragments reveal Jewish dietary practices
    on April 7, 2021 at 4:22 pm

    Archaeologists have found the first evidence of a religious diet locked inside pottery fragments excavated from the early medieval Jewish community.

  • Genomes of the earliest Europeans
    on April 7, 2021 at 4:22 pm

    Ancient genomes shed new light on the earliest Europeans and their relationships with Neanderthals.

  • Genome analysis reveals unknown ancient human migration in Europe
    on April 7, 2021 at 3:12 pm

    Genetic sequencing of human remains dating back 45,000 years has revealed a previously unknown migration into Europe and showed intermixing with Neanderthals in that period was more common than previously thought.

  • Early indicators of magma viscosity could help forecast a volcano's eruption style
    on April 7, 2021 at 3:04 pm

    The properties of the magma inside a volcano affect how an eruption will play out. In particular, the viscosity of this molten rock is a major factor in influencing how hazardous an eruption could be for nearby communities. But it usually only quantified well after an eruption. New work identifies an indicator of magma viscosity that can be measured before an eruption. This could help scientists and emergency managers understand possible patterns of future eruptions.

  • 800-year-old medieval pottery fragments reveal Jewish dietary practices
    on April 7, 2021 at 1:28 pm

    A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, with archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology, have found the first evidence of a religious diet locked inside pottery fragments excavated from the early medieval Jewish community of Oxford.

  • Bone tools found in Kimberley region are among oldest discovered in Australia
    on April 7, 2021 at 11:45 am

    Bone tools found in a well-known Kimberley cave site are more than 35,000 years old and among the oldest discovered in Australia, according to new research.

  • How baked bat guano helped archaeologists understand our ancient past
    on April 6, 2021 at 11:53 am

    In an experiment to understand better how ancient artifacts are altered by the sediment in which they are buried for thousands of years, Australian archaeological scientists buried bones, stones, charcoal and other items in bat guano, cooked it, and analyzed how this affected the different items.

  • Humans were apex predators for two million years
    on April 5, 2021 at 2:24 pm

    Researchers at Tel Aviv University were able to reconstruct the nutrition of stone age humans. In a paper published in the Yearbook of the American Physical Anthropology Association, Dr. Miki Ben-Dor and Prof. Ran Barkai of the Jacob M. Alkov Department of Archaeology at Tel Aviv University, together with Raphael Sirtoli of Portugal, show that humans were an apex predator for about two million years. Only the extinction of larger animals (megafauna) in various parts of the world, and the […]

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