Ancient Colony News

Ancient Colony News

  • Village Dated to First Bulgarian Empire Discovered
    on January 26, 2021 at 10:30 pm

    GRADISHTE, BULGARIA—A previously unknown village dated to the ninth century A.D. was discovered in northeastern Bulgaria by a team of researchers led by Stanislav Ivanov of the Shumen Branch of Bulgaria’s National Institute and Museum of Archaeology in Sofia, according to an Archaeology in Bulgaria report. The site, which is situated in the path of a planned highway, consists of some 80 dugout dwellings constructed during the time of the First Bulgarian Empire. During this period, the […]

  • Storm Revealed 17th-Century Seawall in Southern England
    on January 26, 2021 at 10:00 pm

    PORTSMOUTH, ENGLAND—A wall and a slipway for launching boats into the water were revealed last month during a storm off England’s southeastern coast, according to a report in The News. Alex Godden of Wessex Archaeology said that mortar from the structure has been dated to the late seventeenth century, when the defenses for the city of Portsmouth were redesigned. “The possible slipway may have originally flanked a series of steps to allow access from the defenses on to the beach, while the […]

  • 350,000-Year-Old Rubbing Tool Tested
    on January 26, 2021 at 9:30 pm

    HAIFA, ISRAEL—According to a Science News report, Ron Shimelmitz of the University of Haifa suggests that an artifact unearthed in Israel’s Tabun Cave in the 1960s is a 350,000-year-old tool for grinding and rubbing hides or plants. Shimelmitz and his colleagues found microscopic signs of wear and polish on the stone tool and compared them to marks they made on nine similar stones collected near the cave site, which is located in the coastal mountains of northern Israel. The team members […]

  • Ancient Shipwrecks in Aegean Sea Investigated
    on January 26, 2021 at 9:00 pm

    ATHENS, GREECE—Tornos News reports that scientists and divers from the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities of Greece’s Ministry of Culture and Sports and the Institute of Historical Research of the National Research Foundation explored shipwrecks in the Aegean Sea near the island of Kasos over a period of three years. The researchers explained that this area around Greece’s southernmost island was an important route for several different ancient cultures. They investigated a Roman […]

  • Inequality in medieval Cambridge was 'recorded on the bones' of its residents
    on January 26, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Social inequality was "recorded on the bones" of Cambridge's medieval residents, according to a new study of hundreds of human remains excavated from three very different burial sites within the historic city centre.

  • Medieval Coins Discovered in Romania
    on January 25, 2021 at 10:30 pm

    ZALĂU COUNTY, ROMANIA—Romania-Insider reports that metal detectorist Cristian Marincaş alerted authorities after he discovered 6 silver coins in northwestern Romania. Archaeologists from the Zalău County Museum of History and Art found an additional 30 silver coins at the site. The researchers determined that the coins were minted between 1551 and 1599 in Poland, Lithuania, Riga, and Hungary. No evidence of a ceramic or metal container was found at the site, however, which suggests the […]

  • Fort, Church, and Temple Remains Uncovered in Southern Egypt
    on January 25, 2021 at 10:00 pm

    ASWAN, EGYPT—Egypt Today reports that researchers from Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities have discovered traces of a temple dated to the Ptolemaic dynasty, a Roman fort, and part of a Coptic-period Christian church at the Shiha Fort site in southern Egypt. The remains of the temple include part of a sandstone panel engraved with the image of the temple entrance and the figure of a Roman emperor standing next to an altar, and blocks of sandstone engraved with images of palm fronds. […]

  • Roman Marble Table Unearthed in Bulgaria
    on January 25, 2021 at 9:30 pm

    VARNA, BULGARIA—According to an Archaeology in Bulgaria report, more than 100 pieces of a household table dated to the fourth century A.D. have been found in one of the towers at the Petrich Kale Fortress, which is located on a plateau in northeastern Bulgaria near the coast of the Black Sea. Researchers from the Varna Museum of Archaeology think the table may have been used by a high-ranking Roman official. “It is a round table made of white marble, and is known in scientific literature as […]

  • Researchers Explore Bronze Age Currency
    on January 25, 2021 at 9:00 pm

    LEIDEN, NETHERLANDS—Courthouse News Service reports that researchers led by Maikel H.G. Kuijpers of Leiden University analyzed more than 5,000 of copper objects discovered north of the Alps and found that about 70 percent of the rings and many of the ribs and ax blades all weighed about seven ounces. People would have been able to weigh the objects by hand, Kuijpers explained. This uniformity, perhaps produced by casting the objects in molds, could indicate they were used as currency some […]

  • First people to enter the Americas likely did so with their dogs
    on January 25, 2021 at 8:00 pm

    The first people to settle in the Americas likely brought their own canine companions with them, according to new research which sheds more light on the origin of dogs.

  • Elusive 19th century Alaskan fort located using radar tech
    on January 25, 2021 at 6:18 pm

    Researchers from Cornell University and the National Park Service have pinpointed and confirmed the location of the remnants of a wooden fort in Alaska—the Tlingit people's last physical bulwark against Russian colonization forces in 1804—by using geophysical imaging techniques and ground-penetrating radar.

  • Pompeii's museum comes back to life to display amazing finds
    on January 25, 2021 at 5:57 pm

    Decades after suffering bombing and earthquake damage, Pompeii's museum has been reborn, showing off exquisite finds from excavations of the ancient Roman city.

  • Climate change in antiquity: Mass emigration due to water scarcity
    on January 25, 2021 at 5:54 pm

    The absence of monsoon rains at the source of the Nile was the cause of migrations and the demise of entire settlements in the late Roman province of Egypt. This demographic development has been compared with environmental data for the first time by professor of ancient history, Sabine Huebner of the University of Basel—leading to a discovery of climate change and its consequences.

  • Climate change in antiquity: Mass emigration due to water scarcity
    on January 25, 2021 at 4:31 pm

    The absence of monsoon rains at the source of the Nile was the cause of migrations and the demise of entire settlements in the late Roman province of Egypt. This demographic development has been compared with environmental data for the first time by professor of ancient history, leading to a discovery of climate change and its consequences.

  • Neolithic Cursus Monument Spotted on Scottish Isle
    on January 22, 2021 at 10:30 pm

    ARRAN, SCOTLAND—The Scotsman reports that a Neolithic cursus monument was spotted on the Isle of Arran with the use of lidar scanning technology. Such structures were made up of long lines of timber posts that may have marked a processional route. Sometimes the monuments were burned. Dave Cowley of Historic Environment Scotland said this is the first cursus monument to be found on the island. “What this example at Tormore tells is there are probably actually many more of them but because […]

  • Mughal-Era Water Tank Unearthed in Northern India
    on January 22, 2021 at 10:00 pm

    AGRA, INDIA—The Times of India reports that a water tank and fountain dated to the sixteenth century have been uncovered near the Todarmal Baradari, the ruins of an ornate summer house in the town of Fatehpur Sikri, by researchers from the Archaeological Survey of India. The town served as the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1571 to 1585 during the reign of Emperor Akbar the Great. The tank measures about 28 feet square and about 3.5 feet deep. Archaeologist Vasant Swarankar said its […]

  • Survey Reveals Viking-Era Site in Northern Norway
    on January 22, 2021 at 9:30 pm

    TRONDHEIM, NORWAY—According to a statement released by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, a survey conducted in northern Norway’s Bodø municipality with ground-penetrating radar detected the presence of 15 burial mounds, one of which may contain a boat grave. Archaeologist Arne Anderson Stamnes said the size and shape of the mounds suggests that they date to between A.D. 650 and 950, or the Viking Age. The largest mound measures about 100 feet across, he explained. The […]

  • Byzantine Inscription Uncovered in Israel
    on January 22, 2021 at 9:00 pm

    JERUSALEM, ISRAEL—According to a statement released by the Israel Antiquities Authority, a Greek inscription including the phrase “Christ born of Mary,” was found in the village of et-Taiyiba in northern Israel’s Jezreel Valley, on a stone that had been reused in a wall dated to the Byzantine or Early Islamic period. The inscription itself is thought to date to the late fifth century, when the stone was originally used as part of a church’s doorway frame. Leah Di-Segni of the Hebrew […]

  • Thousands of Coins Unearthed in Hungary
    on January 21, 2021 at 10:30 pm

    BUDAPEST, HUNGARY—Live Science reports that Balázs Nagy of the Ferenczy Museum and a team of archaeologists and volunteers working with metal detectors discovered a cache of nearly 7,000 silver coins and four gold ones in a broken vessel on a hill in central Hungary. The vessel may have been broken by plowing. The oldest coin is Roman and dates to the reign of Lucius Verus, who was emperor from A.D. 161 to 169. The most recent coins date to the reign of Louis II, who ruled Hungary and […]

  • Maya Stucco Sculpture Discovered in Mexico
    on January 21, 2021 at 10:00 pm

    CANSAHCAB, MEXICO—Yucatán Magazine reports that a giant stucco mask dated to the fourth century was discovered at the archaeological site of Ucanha, which is located on the Yucatan Peninsula near the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, by a team of researchers including Jacob Welch of Yale University. Researchers from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said the Maya mask resembles others found in Yucatan at the Maya sites of Acanche and Izamal. Such stucco artifacts are […]

  • More on Saqqara’s New Kingdom Burials
    on January 21, 2021 at 9:30 pm

    CAIRO, EGYPT—According to a Live Science report, a copy of chapter 17 of the Book of the Dead was recovered from one of the New Kingdom burial shafts recently discovered in the Saqqara necropolis, near the pyramid of Teti, a king of the Sixth Dynasty. People buried in the shafts are thought to have been members of a cult that worshipped the pharaoh for about 1,000 years after his death around 2291 B.C. The name “Pwkhaef” was written on the papyrus, one of the wooden coffins recovered from […]

  • Early humans used chopping tools to break animal bones and consume the bone marrow
    on January 21, 2021 at 8:00 pm

    Researchers from the Sonia and Marco Nadler Institute of Archaeology at Tel Aviv University unraveled the function of flint tools known as "chopping tools," found at the prehistoric site of Revadim, east of Ashdod. Applying advanced research methods, they examined use-wear traces on 53 chopping tools, as well as organic residues found on some of the tools. They also made and used replicas of the tools, with methods of experimental archaeology. The researchers concluded that tools of this type, […]

  • Early humans used chopping tools to break animal bones and consume the bone marrow
    on January 21, 2021 at 6:21 pm

    Researchers found that stone tools of the type known as 'chopping tools' were used to break open the bones of animals. Tools of this type were used for over two million years. They were found in large quantities at prehistoric sites all over the Old World, but no one understood their exact function.

  • Burial practices point to an interconnected early Medieval Europe
    on January 21, 2021 at 6:17 pm

    Changes in Western European burial practices spread rapidly during the 6th - 8th centuries AD, providing strong evidence that early Medieval Europe was a well-connected place with a shared culture.

  • Burial practices point to an interconnected early Medieval Europe
    on January 21, 2021 at 5:41 pm

    Early Medieval Europe is frequently viewed as a time of cultural stagnation, often given the misnomer of the 'Dark Ages'. However, analysis has revealed new ideas could spread rapidly as communities were interconnected, creating a surprisingly unified culture in Europe.

  • On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
    on January 20, 2021 at 8:10 pm

    In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a new study.

  • On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
    on January 20, 2021 at 7:00 pm

    In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Maikel H. G. Kuijpers and Catalin N. Popa of Leiden University, Netherlands.

  • Georadar reveals 15 burial mounds and 32 Viking Age mysteries
    on January 19, 2021 at 2:21 pm

    November 2019 found Arne Anderson Stamnes, an archaeologist at the NTNU University Museum, methodically wending his way back and forth across the fields just east of the campsite in Bodø municipality. Behind the four-wheeler he's driving, he's towing a ground penetrating radar device.

  • Oldest city in the Americas under threat from squatters
    on January 19, 2021 at 9:08 am

    Having survived for 5,000 years, the oldest archeological site in the Americas is under threat from squatters claiming the coronavirus pandemic has left them with no other option but to occupy the sacred city.

  • A new archaeology for the Anthropocene era
    on January 18, 2021 at 4:31 pm

    Scantily clad tomb raiders and cloistered scholars piecing together old pots -- these are the kinds of stereotypes of archaeology that dominate public perception. Yet archaeology in the new millennium is a world away from these images. In a major new report, researchers probe a thoroughly modern and scientific discipline to understand how it is helping to address the considerable challenges of the Anthropocene.

  • Egypt unveils ancient funerary temple south of Cairo
    on January 17, 2021 at 6:24 pm

    Egypt's former antiquities minister and noted archaeologist Zahi Hawass on Sunday revealed details of an ancient funerary temple in a vast necropolis south of Cairo.

  • The end of domestic wine in 17th century Japan
    on January 15, 2021 at 4:29 pm

    Researchers from Kumamoto University (Japan) have found an Edo period document that clearly indicates the Hosokawa clan, rulers of the Kokura Domain (modern-day Fukuoka Prefecture), completely stopped producing wine in 1632, the year before the shogunate ordered them to move to the Higo Domain (now Kumamoto Prefecture). The researchers believe that the discontinuation of wine production was directly related to this move and because it was considered to be a drink of a religion that was harshly […]

  • Scientists identify contents of ancient Maya drug containers
    on January 15, 2021 at 4:28 pm

    Scientists have identified the presence of a non-tobacco plant in ancient Maya drug containers for the first time.

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