Ancient Colony News

Ancient Colony News

  • 17th-Century English Book Found in College Library in Spain
    on September 24, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    MADRID, SPAIN—BBC News reports that John Stone of the University of Barcelona has found a 1634 printing of The Two Noble Kinsmen, a play written by William Shakespeare with John Fletcher, a house playwright for the theater group the King’s Men. The play appears in a book of English plays held at the Royal Scots College, which is now located in Salamanca, Spain. In the seventeenth century, the college was located in Madrid, and was a rare source of English literature for Spanish […]

  • Chromium Detected in Iran’s 1,000-Year-Old Crucible Steel
    on September 24, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    LONDON, ENGLAND—Gizmodo reports that evidence unearthed at Chahak, an archaeological site in southern Iran, suggests that ancient Persians added a chromium mineral to their alloys to produce low-chromium steel in the eleventh century A.D. It had been previously thought that chromium steel, also known as stainless steel, was first produced in the twentieth century. Steel was produced at the site by placing a mixture of iron and other minerals, including about one to two percent chromium and […]

  • Neandertals have adopted male sex chromosome from modern humans
    on September 24, 2020 at 7:56 pm

    In 1997, the very first Neandertal DNA sequence—just a small part of the mitochondrial genome—was determined from an individual discovered in the Neander Valley, Germany, in 1856. Since then, improvements in molecular techniques have enabled scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology to determine high quality sequences of the autosomal genomes of several Neandertals, and led to the discovery of an entirely new group of extinct humans, the Denisovans, who were […]

  • Sweden: Bones of dog found at Stone Age burial site
    on September 24, 2020 at 2:13 pm

    Archaeologists on Thursday reported finding the remains of a dog from more than 8,400 years ago at a human burial site in southern Sweden.

  • Medieval Monastery Excavated in Ireland’s County Meath
    on September 23, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    COUNTY MEATH, IRELAND—The Irish Independent reports that archaeologists led by Geraldine Stout have uncovered pottery; the bones of cows, sheep, cats, and dogs; seeds; nuts; a key; a timber dash-urn with a paddle for churning butter; and a bakery at the site of a thirteenth-century monastery in eastern Ireland. The monastery was equipped with a communal latrine, a water system, and a cellar to support between 30 and 50 monks. Previous investigation of the site revealed French jugs and ceramic […]

  • Mosaics Revealed in Fourth-Century Church in Turkey
    on September 23, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    MARDIN, TURKEY—Abdulgani Tarkan of the Mardin Museum told the Anadolu Agency that a team of excavators has uncovered the mosaic floors in a 1,600-year-old Christian church discovered last year in southeastern Turkey. The images on the floors include a nine-line inscription written in the ancient Syriac alphabet. “The mosaics are also decorated with animal depictions, geometric ornaments, and human figures, including scenes depicting people…hunting,” Tarkan explained. Some of the images […]

  • Early 20th-Century Artifacts Unearthed at Estate Site in Scotland
    on September 23, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND—The Edinburgh Evening News reports that excavations at the ruins of Cammo House, a structure first built in the late seventeenth century, have uncovered objects thought to belong Margaret Wright, who was the housekeeper at the mansion in the years leading up to World War I. Volunteers working with the Edinburgh Archaeological Field Society found the cache of objects, which includes tonic and perfume bottles, false teeth, and cooking equipment, in the servants’ area known […]

  • Chromium steel was first made in ancient Persia
    on September 23, 2020 at 7:51 am

    Chromium steel—similar to what we know today as tool steel—was first made in Persia, nearly a millennium earlier than experts previously thought, according to a new study led by UCL researchers.

  • Jaws of death: Paleontologist renames giant, prehistoric marine lizard
    on September 23, 2020 at 7:48 am

    Some 92 to 66 million years ago, as the age of dinosaurs waned, giant marine lizards called mosasaurs roamed an ocean that covered North America from Utah to Missouri and Texas to the Yukon. The air-breathing predators were streamlined swimmers that devoured almost everything in their path, including fish, turtles, clams and even smaller mosasaurs.

  • Possible Remains of 16th-Century French Philosopher Examined
    on September 22, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    BORDEAUX, FRANCE—The AFP reports that researchers are examining human remains recovered from a tomb discovered in late 2019 in the basement of the Aquitaine Museum, which is located in southwestern France. In the sixteenth century, the building housed a convent where the remains of philosopher Michel de Montaigne, who served as mayor of Bordeaux from 1581 to 1585, may have come to rest after his body was moved several times following his death in 1592. Archaeoanthropologist Helene Reveillas […]

  • World War II-Era Sub Spotted in Southeast Asian Waters
    on September 22, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    BANGKOK, THAILAND—The Associated Press reports that divers think they have found the wreckage of the submarine USS Grenadier in the Strait of Malacca. The measurements of the wreckage match the submarine’s naval records, according to Lance Horowitz, a member of the dive team. “A complete review, analysis, and documentation may take two months to a year to complete,” added Robert Neyland of the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Underwater Archaeology Branch. In 1945, Lt. Cdr. John […]

  • Study Documents Medieval Islamic Architecture at the Alhambra
    on September 22, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    GRENADA, SPAIN—According to a statement released by the University of Seville, an international team of researchers including Antonio Gámiz of the University of Seville have found previously unidentified details in the muqarnas, or ornamental vaults, in the two temples in the Lions’ Courtyard at the Alhambra, a medieval Islamic palace. To track the repairs made to the fourteenth-century structures, the researchers reviewed historic drawings of the muqarnas dating back to the seventeenth […]

  • Wild birds as offerings to the Egyptian gods
    on September 22, 2020 at 7:37 pm

    Millions of ibis and birds of prey mummies, sacrificed to the Egyptian gods Horus, Ra or Thoth, have been discovered in the necropolises of the Nile Valley. Such a quantity of mummified birds raises the question of their origin: Were they bred, like cats, or were they hunted? Scientists from the CNRS, the Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and the C2RMF have carried out extensive geochemical analyses on mummies from the Musée des Confluences, Lyon. According to their results, published on 22nd […]

  • Wild birds as offerings to the Egyptian gods
    on September 22, 2020 at 3:22 pm

    Millions of mummified ibis and birds of prey, sacrificed to the Egyptian gods Horus, Ra or Thoth, have been discovered in the necropolises of the Nile Valley. Such a quantity of mummified birds raises the question of their origin: were they bred, like cats, or were they hunted? According to a team of scientists that carried out extensive geochemical analyses on mummies, they were wild birds.

  • Ancient Clay Tablet Offers Insights into the Gilgamesh Epic
    by Robin Ngo on September 22, 2020 at 2:04 pm

    An ancient clay tablet acquired in recent years by the Sulaymaniyah Museum in Iraq offers new insights into the Gilgamesh Epic. The post Ancient Clay Tablet Offers Insights into the Gilgamesh Epic appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

  • Early Bronze Age: Megiddo’s Great Temple and the Birth of Urban Culture in the Levant
    by Noah Wiener on September 22, 2020 at 10:57 am

    Megiddo’s Great Temple is a structure that, according to its excavators, “has proven to be the most monumental single edifice so far uncovered in the EB I Levant and ranks among the largest structures of its time in the Near East.” The post Early Bronze Age: Megiddo’s Great Temple and the Birth of Urban Culture in the Levant appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

  • Egyptian Mummy Portrait Compared to Facial Reconstruction
    on September 21, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    MUNICH, GERMANY—Live Science reports that a team of scientists created a 3-D image of the body of a child who died in Egypt sometime between 50 B.C. and A.D. 100 with CT scans and X-rays, and then compared the likeness with his mummy portrait. Examination of his teeth indicate the child was between the ages of three and four at the time of death. Andreas Nerlich of the Academic Clinic Munich-Bogenhausen said the resulting facial reconstruction is very similar to the ancient painting, although […]

  • Shipwreck from 17th-Century War Found Near Denmark
    on September 21, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—The Copenhagen Post reports that the wreckage of the Delmenhorst, one of the first ships constructed from drawings, was found some 500 feet off the coast of Denmark during offshore construction work. The warship, now almost completely buried in the seabed, was grounded in 1644 during the Battle of Fehmarn, fought between the Danes and a Swedish and Dutch fleet as part of a brief conflict called the Torstenson War. The Danes attempted to protect the Delmenhorst with a […]

  • Genetic Study Offers New Thoughts on Horse Domestication
    on September 21, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    PARIS, FRANCE—According to a Cosmos Magazine report, an international team of researchers led by Silvia Guimaraes of the Institut Jacques Monod analyzed the genomes of horses who lived in Anatolia and the Caucasus between 9000 and 500 B.C. In particular, they looked at the animals’ mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosomes, and DNA markers linked to coat color, and found that genetic patterns associated with domestication appeared suddenly in the Anatolian horses around 2000 B.C. If horses had been […]

  • Bird beak revealed by laser imaging informs early beak function and development
    on September 21, 2020 at 2:45 pm

    Confuciusornis was a crow-like fossil bird that lived in the Cretaceous ~120 million years ago. It was one of the first birds to evolve a beak. Early beak evolution remains understudied. Using an imaging technique called Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence (LSF), researchers at the University of Hong Kong (HKU) address this by revealing just how different the beak and jaw of Confuciusornis were compared to birds we see today.

  • Modelling of ancient fossil movement reveals step in the evolution of posture in dinosaur and...
    on September 21, 2020 at 2:01 pm

    Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis–a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago–and inferred that it had a "mosaic" of functions in locomotion.

  • Dino teeth research prove giant predatory dinosaur lived in water
    on September 21, 2020 at 1:39 pm

    A discovery of more than a thousand dinosaur teeth, by a team of researchers from the University of Portsmouth, proves beyond reasonable doubt that Spinosaurus, the giant predator made famous by the movie Jurassic Park III as well as the BBC documentary Planet Dinosaur was an enormous river-monster.

  • Troubles in Tuva: Raids and bloody rituals among ancient steppe nomads
    on September 21, 2020 at 1:38 pm

    Ancient historiographers described steppe nomads as violent people dedicated to warfare and plundering. However, little archeological and anthropological data are available regarding violence in these communities during the early centuries CE. In a new study in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, an international team led by researchers from the University of Bern and the Russian Academy of Sciences presents new discoveries about the types of violence lived by nomads from Siberia […]

  • Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread 4,000 years ago
    on September 21, 2020 at 1:16 pm

    New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago Ph.D. candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.

  • Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread 4000 years ago
    on September 21, 2020 at 1:15 pm

    New bioarchaeology research has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.

  • Researchers find genetic signature of ancient MacDougall bloodline
    on September 21, 2020 at 1:04 pm

    Genetic markers for the Clan MacDougall have been discovered by Genealogy researchers at the University of Strathclyde.

  • Archaeologists unearth 27 coffins at Egypt's Saqqara pyramid
    on September 21, 2020 at 7:39 am

    Egyptian archaeologists have unearthed more than two dozen ancient coffins in a vast necropolis south of Cairo, an official said Monday.

  • Three Bronze Sculptures Repatriated to India
    on September 18, 2020 at 10:00 pm

    LONDON, ENGLAND—The Hindustan Times reports that in a remote ceremony, British police officials handed over three sculptures stolen from a temple site in India’s southern state of Tamil Nadu in 1978 to Prahlad Singh Patel, India’s Minister for Culture and Tourism. The sculptures represent Lord Ram, his brother Lakshman, and wife Sita, who are central to the ancient epic the Ramayana. “The Metropolitan Police are proud to have been involved in the return of these Chola bronzes to […]

  • 120,000-Year-Old Hominin Footprints Found in Saudi Arabia
    on September 18, 2020 at 9:30 pm

    JENA, GERMANY—Science Magazine reports that seven hominin footprints dated to some 120,000 years ago with optical stimulated luminescence were identified among hundreds of animal prints in northern Saudi Arabia’s Nefud Desert. The prints are thought to have been left by two or three modern humans who may have come to what was then a shallow lake along with camels, buffalo, and elephants, according to Mathew Stewart of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology. “We know that humans […]

  • Neanderthal Child’s Tooth Discovered in Italy
    on September 18, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    BOLOGNA, ITALY—According to a statement released by the University of Bologna, researchers from the University of Bologna and the University of Ferrara have uncovered a Neanderthal child’s milk tooth in northern Italy’s Broion Cave. The child is thought to have been 11 or 12 years old when it died between some 45,000 to 48,000 years ago, making the child one of the last Neanderthals to live in Italy. Analysis of DNA recovered from the small canine tooth indicates the child was related, on […]

  • Eighteenth-Century Artifacts Unearthed in North Carolina
    on September 18, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    COLERAIN, NORTH CAROLINA—The Charlotte Observer reports that a farmer in North Carolina discovered a Revolutionary War–era site on his land near the Chowan River. Charles Ewen of East Carolina University said the recovered artifacts include broken wine bottles, china, British-made smoking pipes, large ceramic storage vessels, keys, locks, bone-handled utensils, oyster shells, an ornate marble font, and a glass jewel inscribed with the words “Wilkes and Liberty 45” that is identical to a […]

  • Raids and bloody rituals among ancient steppe nomads
    on September 18, 2020 at 2:42 pm

    Traces of violence on 1700 year old skeletons allow researchers to reconstruct warfare and sacrifices of nomads in Siberia. An international and interdisciplinary team of anthropologists, archaeologists and specialists in forensic sciences performed a detailed and revealing analysis of the traumas found on the skeletal remains.

  • The Expulsion of the Hyksos
    by Noah Wiener on September 18, 2020 at 2:13 pm

    In the 16th century B.C.E., Ahmose I overthrew the Hyksos and initiated the 18th Dynasty and the New Kingdom of Egypt. Recent archaeological discoveries at Tel Habuwa shed new light on Ahmose’s campaign. The post The Expulsion of the Hyksos appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

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