Archeology News

Archeology News

Archaeology News

Fossil holds new insights into how fish evolved onto land

The fossil of an early snake-like animal -- called Lethiscus stocki -- has kept its evolutionary secrets for the last 340-million years. Now, an international team of researchers has revealed new insights into the ancient Scottish fossil that dramatically challenge our understanding of the early evolution of tetrapods, or four-limbed animals with backbones.
Author:
Posted: June 21, 2017, 8:59 pm

Reconstruction of ancient chromosomes offers insight into mammalian evolution

Researchers have gone back in time, at least virtually, computationally recreating the chromosomes of the first eutherian mammal, the long-extinct, shrewlike ancestor of all placental mammals.
Author:
Posted: June 21, 2017, 6:51 pm

Ancient skulls shed light on migration in the Roman empire

Skeletal evidence shows that, hundreds of years after the Roman Republic conquered most of the Mediterranean world, coastal communities in what is now south and central Italy still bore distinct physical differences to one another -- though the same could not be said of the area around Rome itself.
Author:
Posted: June 20, 2017, 3:41 pm

Wet and stormy weather lashed California coast... 8,200 years ago

An analysis of stalagmite records from White Moon Cave in the Santa Cruz Mountains shows that 8200 years ago the California coast underwent 150 years of exceptionally wet and stormy weather. This is the first high resolution record of how the Holocene cold snap affected the California climate.
Author:
Posted: June 20, 2017, 1:32 pm

A wooden toe: Swiss Egyptologists study 3000-year-old prosthesis

It is likely to be one of the oldest prosthetic devices in human history: Together with other experts, Egyptologists have reexamined an artificial wooden big toe. The find is almost 3000 years old and was discovered in a female burial from the necropolis of Sheikh ´Abd el-Qurna close to Luxor. This area is currently being studied using state-of-the-art methods.
Author:
Posted: June 20, 2017, 1:31 pm

A wooden toe: Swiss Egyptologists study 3000-year-old prosthesis

It is likely to be one of the oldest prosthetic devices in human history: Together with other experts, Egyptologists have reexamined an artificial wooden big toe. The find is almost 3000 years old and was discovered in a female burial from the necropolis of Sheikh ´Abd el-Qurna close to Luxor. This area is currently being studied using state-of-the-art methods.
Author:
Posted: June 20, 2017, 1:31 pm

Ancient Military Correspondence: Send Wine


Send wine: A newly deciphered letter from Israel’s Negev desert describes an exchange of supplies between two Judahite military officers.

The post Ancient Military Correspondence: Send Wine appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Robin Ngo
Posted: June 20, 2017, 1:10 pm

Bacterial classification may be more elusive than previously thought

A new study provides new insights into processes behind the evolution of microorganisms and describes what it means for existing bacterial classification approaches.
Author:
Posted: June 19, 2017, 8:54 pm

Volcanic eruptions triggered dawn of the dinosaurs

Huge pulses of volcanic activity are likely to have played a key role in triggering the end Triassic mass extinction, which set the scene for the rise and age of the dinosaurs, new research has found.
Author:
Posted: June 19, 2017, 7:15 pm

Tiny fossils reveal backstory of the most mysterious amphibian alive

The fossils of an extinct species from the Triassic Period are the long-missing link that connects Kermit the Frog's amphibian brethren to wormlike creatures with a backbone and two rows of sharp teeth, new research shows. Named Chinlestegophis jenkinsi, the newfound fossil is the oldest relative of the most mysterious group of amphibians: caecilians. Today, these limbless, colorful serpentine carnivores live underground and range in size from 6 inches to 5 feet.
Author:
Posted: June 19, 2017, 7:15 pm

Ancient DNA reveals role of Near East and Egypt in cat domestication

DNA found at archaeological sites reveals that the origins of our domestic cat are in the Near East and ancient Egypt. Cats were domesticated by the first farmers some 10,000 years ago. They later spread across Europe and other parts of the world via trade hub Egypt. The DNA analysis also revealed that most of these ancient cats had stripes: spotted cats were uncommon until the Middle Ages.
Author:
Posted: June 19, 2017, 4:58 pm

Ancient DNA reveals role of Near East and Egypt in cat domestication

DNA found at archaeological sites reveals that the origins of our domestic cat are in the Near East and ancient Egypt. Cats were domesticated by the first farmers some 10,000 years ago. They later spread across Europe and other parts of the world via trade hub Egypt. The DNA analysis also revealed that most of these ancient cats had stripes: spotted cats were uncommon until the Middle Ages.
Author:
Posted: June 19, 2017, 4:58 pm

Jerusalem tower younger than thought

Gihon Spring was crucial to the survival of its inhabitants, and archaeologists had uncovered the remains of a massive stone tower built to guard this vital water supply. Based on pottery and other regional findings, the archaeologists had originally assigned it a date of 1,700 BCE. But new research provides conclusive evidence that the stones at the base of the tower were laid nearly 1,000 years later.
Author:
Posted: June 15, 2017, 4:06 pm

Jerusalem tower younger than thought

Gihon Spring was crucial to the survival of its inhabitants, and archaeologists had uncovered the remains of a massive stone tower built to guard this vital water supply. Based on pottery and other regional findings, the archaeologists had originally assigned it a date of 1,700 BCE. But new research provides conclusive evidence that the stones at the base of the tower were laid nearly 1,000 years later.
Author:
Posted: June 15, 2017, 4:06 pm

Animal evolution: Hot start, followed by cold shock

The initial phases of animal evolution proceeded faster than hitherto supposed: New analyses suggest that the first animal phyla emerged in rapid succession -- prior to the global Ice Age that set in around 700 million years ago.
Author:
Posted: June 15, 2017, 12:45 pm

Multispectral imaging reveals ancient Hebrew inscription undetected for over 50 years

Using advanced imaging technology, researchers have discovered a hitherto invisible inscription on the back of a pottery shard dating from 600 BCE that has been on display at The Israel Museum for more than 50 years.
Author:
Posted: June 14, 2017, 8:05 pm

Brazilian carnivorous mammal-like reptile fossil may be new Aleodon species

Some Late Triassic Brazilian fossils of mammal-like reptiles, previously identified as Chiniquodon, may in fact be the first Aleodon specimens found outside Africa.
Author:
Posted: June 14, 2017, 6:15 pm

Dawn of humanity: Neanderthal-Homo sapiens transition

Archaeologists have provided a window into one of the most exciting periods in human history -- the transition between Neanderthals and modern humans.
Author:
Posted: June 14, 2017, 3:42 pm

Dawn of humanity: Neanderthal-Homo sapiens transition

Archaeologists have provided a window into one of the most exciting periods in human history -- the transition between Neanderthals and modern humans.
Author:
Posted: June 14, 2017, 3:42 pm

Ancient otter tooth found in Mexico suggests mammals migrated across America

An ancient otter tooth recently discovered in Mexico suggests certain mammals migrated across America during the Miocene geologic epoch, roughly 23 million to 5.3 million years ago. The new hypothesized route questions other theories such as migrations above Canada and through Panama, and has implications for a much larger biologic event -- the Great American Biotic Interchange, when land bridges were formed and animals dispersed to and from North America and South America.
Author:
Posted: June 14, 2017, 1:29 pm

Healthy diet? That depends on your genes

Shifts in the diets of Europeans after the introduction of farming 10,000 years ago led to genetic adaptations that favored the dietary trends of the time, new research indicates. The study has implications for the growing field of nutritional genomics, called nutrigenomics. Based on one's ancestry, clinicians may one day tailor each person's diet to her or his genome to improve health and prevent disease.
Author:
Posted: June 12, 2017, 7:35 pm

The secrets of tooth calcium revealed

Two studies on calcium isotopes in teeth have provided new insights into both the extinction of the marine reptiles and weaning age in humans. The findings open new avenues for research in anthropology and paleontology, say researchers.
Author:
Posted: June 12, 2017, 1:44 pm

Imaging helps to spot fake ancient daggers

Collectors have become increasingly interested in weapons from ancient Asia and the Middle East. Attempting to fight forgeries, physicists are now adding their imaging power to authenticate these weapons.
Author:
Posted: June 12, 2017, 1:41 pm

Extinct early whales listened like their relatives on land, fossil evidence shows

Whales show surprisingly vast differences in hearing ability. Baleen whales tune into infrasonic sounds to communicate over long distances. Toothed whales do just the opposite, relying on ultrasonic frequencies too high for humans to hear. Now researchers have fossil evidence from extinct early whale species to suggest that those differences in hearing arose only after whales evolved into the fully aquatic animals we know today.
Author:
Posted: June 8, 2017, 4:36 pm

No Matches? No Problem. Ancient Fire-Making in Israel


Archaeologists excavated a 9,000-year-old limestone slab in Ramat Bet Shemesh that might have been used in Neolithic fire-making.

The post No Matches? No Problem. Ancient Fire-Making in Israel appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Robin Ngo
Posted: June 8, 2017, 3:04 pm

Student makes big discovery during anthropology dig on battle site

An anthropology student working on an archaeological site near Arkansas City, Kansas, has discovered an artifact dating back to the 1600s.
Author:
Posted: June 8, 2017, 11:35 am

Student makes big discovery during anthropology dig on battle site

An anthropology student working on an archaeological site near Arkansas City, Kansas, has discovered an artifact dating back to the 1600s.
Author:
Posted: June 8, 2017, 11:35 am

World's 'first named dinosaur' reveals new teeth with scanning tech

Pioneering technology has shed fresh light on the world's first scientifically-described dinosaur fossil -- over 200 years after it was first discovered -- thanks to research.
Author:
Posted: June 8, 2017, 2:24 am

World's oldest fossil mushroom found

Roughly 115 million years ago, when the ancient supercontinent Gondwana was breaking apart, a mushroom fell into a river and began an improbable journey. Its ultimate fate as a mineralized fossil preserved in limestone in northeast Brazil makes it a scientific wonder, scientists report.
Author:
Posted: June 7, 2017, 6:13 pm

Homo sapiens 100,000 years earlier: Ancestors' diet of game revealed

New fossil finds from Morocco do more than push back the origins of our species by 100,000 years. They also reveal what was on the menu for our oldest-known Homo sapiens ancestors 300,000 years ago: Plenty of gazelle.
Author:
Posted: June 7, 2017, 5:32 pm

Reshaping Darwin's tree of life

In 1859, Charles Darwin included a novel tree of life in his trailblazing book on the theory of evolution, On the Origin of Species. Now, scientists want to reshape Darwin's tree.
Author:
Posted: June 7, 2017, 4:38 pm

3-D-modeling of food residues in 230 million years old fossil feces

Synchrotron scanning can produce high-quality 3-D models of well-preserved food residues from fossil feces.
Author:
Posted: June 7, 2017, 4:37 pm

200 years of the bicycle: Computer scientists electrify historic “dandy horse”

Small children still use a form of the so-called dandy horse, balance bike or draisine, which the inventor Karl von Drais first tested on a longer route on June 12, 1817. Now, about 200 years later, computer scientists are making the forerunner of the bicycle attractive for adults as well.
Author:
Posted: June 7, 2017, 12:57 pm

Which extinct ducks could fly?

We're all familiar with flightless birds: ostriches, emus, penguins -- and ducks? Ducks and geese have been especially prone to becoming flightless over the course of evolutionary history, but it can be difficult to determine from fossils whether an extinct species could fly or not. A new study takes a fresh approach, classifying species as flightless or not based on their skeletons and offering a glimpse into the lives of these extinct waterfowl.
Author:
Posted: June 7, 2017, 12:55 pm

Genetic study shakes up the elephant family tree

New research reveals that a species of giant elephant that lived 1.5 million to 100,000 years ago -- ranging across Eurasia before it went extinct -- is more closely related to today's African forest elephant than the forest elephant is to its nearest living relative, the African savanna elephant. Understanding elephant evolution is key to protecting present-day elephants from extinction, researchers say.
Author:
Posted: June 6, 2017, 3:28 pm

How the Arctic Ocean became saline

The Arctic Ocean was once a gigantic freshwater lake. Only after the land bridge between Greenland and Scotland had submerged far enough did vast quantities of salt water pour in from the Atlantic.
Author:
Posted: June 6, 2017, 3:27 pm

Japan's largest complete dinosaur skeleton discovered

The complete skeleton of an eight-meter-long dinosaur has been unearthed from marine deposits dating back 72 million years at Japan's northern island of Hokkaido, making it the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Japan.
Author:
Posted: June 6, 2017, 1:50 pm

New data for old bones: How the famous Cleveland-Lloyd dinosaur bone bed came to be

The Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry is the densest collection of Jurassic dinosaur fossils. Since its discovery in the 1920s, numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of the quarry. Were the dinosaurs poisoned? Did they die due to drought? Were they trapped in quick sand? A new study suggests that the quarry represents numerous mortality events which brought the dinosaurs to the site over time, rather than a single fatal event.
Author:
Posted: June 6, 2017, 1:01 pm

History of ancient geometry diagrams

A Classics student is trying to reconstruct the history of geometrical and mathematical diagrams by examining copies and translations of Elements, the ancient work of Greek mathematician Euclid.
Author:
Posted: June 5, 2017, 7:03 pm

Forensic technique uses forehead X-rays to assess age of juvenile remains

Forensic anthropology researchers have developed a technique that can provide an approximate age for juveniles and young people based on an X-ray of the frontal sinus region of the skull. The technique can be used to help identify human remains in forensic cases, as well as to determine age ranges in archaeological research or for living people for whom no records are available.
Author:
Posted: June 5, 2017, 3:00 pm

Earliest human-made climate change took place 11,500 years ago

A new study has uncovered the earliest known geological indications of humanmade climate change from 11,500 years ago.
Author:
Posted: June 5, 2017, 3:00 pm

Why was a teenager with bone cancer buried on Witch Hill in Panama?

Likely the first bone tumor from an ancient skeleton in Central America has been found by archaeologists. The starburst-shaped tumor is in the upper right arm of the skeleton of an adolescent buried in about 1300 AD in a trash heap at a site in western Panama called Cerro Brujo or Witch Hill. The reason for what appears to be a ritual burial in this abandoned pre-Columbian settlement is unknown.
Author:
Posted: June 1, 2017, 7:18 pm

Why was a teenager with bone cancer buried on Witch Hill in Panama?

Likely the first bone tumor from an ancient skeleton in Central America has been found by archaeologists. The starburst-shaped tumor is in the upper right arm of the skeleton of an adolescent buried in about 1300 AD in a trash heap at a site in western Panama called Cerro Brujo or Witch Hill. The reason for what appears to be a ritual burial in this abandoned pre-Columbian settlement is unknown.
Author:
Posted: June 1, 2017, 7:18 pm

Volcanoes: Referees for the life on Earth

At the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, 200 million years ago, some 60% of species living on Earth disappeared. Scientists suspected that magmatic activity and the release of carbon dioxide were responsible for this environmental disaster. To corroborate this, one would need to find and to precisely date traces of this activity and make sure that it coincides with this mass extinction.
Author:
Posted: June 1, 2017, 4:42 pm

New research reveals earliest directly dated rock paintings from southern Africa

Scientists have pioneered a technique to directly date prehistoric rock paintings in southern Africa, which reveal dates much older than previously thought.
Author:
Posted: June 1, 2017, 4:41 pm

Geoscientific evidence for subglacial lakes

During the last glacial period -- when the ice in the Antarctic was far thicker and extended further offshore than it does today -- it has been speculated that subglacial lakes existed beneath it. An international team of researchers has now successfully sampled the meter-thick sediment layers left behind by these lakes contemporary on the seafloor.
Author:
Posted: June 1, 2017, 12:22 pm

Missed Masada Visit


U.S. President Donald Trump wanted to land his helicopter at the UNESCO World Heritage site of Masada but was denied permission to do so.

The post Missed Masada Visit appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society.

Author: Megan Sauter
Posted: May 31, 2017, 3:48 pm

Human activity has polluted European air for 2,000 years

A new study combining European ice core data and historical records of the infamous Black Death pandemic of 1349-1353 shows metal mining and smelting have polluted the environment for thousands of years, challenging the widespread belief that environmental pollution began with the Industrial Revolution in the 1700s and 1800s.
Author:
Posted: May 31, 2017, 2:33 pm

The first genome data from ancient Egyptian mummies

An international team has successfully recovered ancient DNA from Egyptian mummies dating from approximately 1400 BCE to 400 CE, including the first genome-wide nuclear data, establishing ancient Egyptian mummies as a reliable of ancient DNA. The study found that modern Egyptians share more ancestry with Sub-Saharan Africans than ancient Egyptians did.
Author:
Posted: May 30, 2017, 3:51 pm

Groundwater 'pit stops' enabled survival, migration of our ancient ancestors

The movement of our ancestors across East Africa was shaped by the locations of groundwater springs, suggests new research.
Author:
Posted: May 30, 2017, 3:51 pm

Comments

comments

Sudan’s forgotten pyramids

Sudan’s forgotten pyramids

Nubian pyramids – Bagrawiyah, Sudan – More than 200km from the Sudanese capital Khartoum, the remains of an ancient city rise from the arid and inhospitable terrain like a science-fiction film set. Nestled between sand dunes, the secluded pyramids seem to have been forgotten by the modern world, with no nearby restaurants or hotels to cater to tourists.

The Nubian Meroe pyramids, much smaller but just as impressive as the more famous Egyptian ones, are found on the east bank of the Nile river, near a group of villages called Bagrawiyah. The pyramids get their name from the ancient city of Meroe, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom situated in what is now the Republic of Sudan.

Comments

comments

Designed by CyFocus.com
Powered by CyFocus.net